1 Jul 2020
1:00 pm ET 60 mins

When you are not meeting face to face, your presence is reduced to a thumbnail on a web conference. When delivering training virtually, you are competing with a highly distracting on-screen environment. In other words, it is harder than ever to keep your audience’s attention. To cut through the noise and win, your virtual presentation needs to hook your audience from the start, keep them engaged and deliver a highly memorable message to drive lasting behavior change.

Join us for this complimentary Training Industry webinar, sponsored by Corporate Visions. Chief strategy officer Tim Riesterer will draw from brain science principles and a research-based approach to show you how to:

  • Grab and hold your audience’s attention with dynamic and interactive storytelling.
  • Prime their brain and spike attention with high-impact imagery.
  • Control the most important message you want your audience to remember.

 

The transcript for this webinar follows:

Sarah Gallo:
Hello, and welcome to today’s training industry webinar, how to make virtual training presentations, engaging and memorable sponsored by corporate visions. I’m Sarah Gallo and associate editor here at training industry. And I’m so happy you could join us today. Before we get started, I’d like to go over just a few housekeeping items to help you interact with our speaker and get the most out of today’s program throughout today’s event. Please feel free to check any comments or questions you have into your chat window or QA window. We’ll address all of these comments and or questions either during the event or at the end of the program during a Q and a session. We also encourage you to share the information you receive today with your network on social media. Make sure to follow the Twitter handle core V and the hashtag T I webinars to stay connected. After today’s event, you’ll receive a brief evaluation survey. We would greatly welcome any feedback you have about today’s speaker content or anything else you’d like to share. And as always art today’s webinar will be recorded and archived on training industry.com and you will be receiving a follow up email from us with a link to the on demand program for you to share with your team.

Sarah Gallo:
If this is your first webinar with us, a special welcome goes out to you here at training industry, we offer dozens of webinars each year on subjects ranging from learning technologies to design thinking. We cover just about every topic relevant to leaders of training organizations around the world. If you have attended one of our programs in the past, thank you so much for logging on with us again today. All right. Without any further ado, let me go ahead and introduce you to our speaker today. Tim Riesterer, Tim is the chief strategy officer at corporate visions, and it’s dedicated to improving marketing messages and advancing the conversations salespeople have with prospects and customers, a visionary thought leader, keynote speaker and practitioner with over 20 years of experience in marketing and sales management is the co author of four books, including custom message management conversations that win the complex sale, the three value conversations and the expansion sale. All right, with that, Tim, I’ll let you go ahead and take it away.

Tim Riesterer:
All right. Thanks, sir. I appreciate that. And welcome to everybody. It’s an amazing, uh, group international grouping that I’m seeing, uh, joining us here today. It’s uh, uh, I’ll just share where I’m from. I’m from the Midwest of the United States, just outside Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I saw some Wisconsinites there, so go badgers, but great to see everybody here. Um, so this is going to be, uh, I want this to be interactive, so get ready to be on chat and make sure you’re chatting to everyone, not just the panelists so that they can see it. And we’re going to give you some opportunities to engage here and report out some of what we’re finding. So one of the things I want to talk about, and I’m going to be honest about where we’re coming from here today is I’m going to be talking primarily about persuasive selling presentations, but arguably, if you’re not a quota carrying sales person, often you are making presentations to persuade someone.

Tim Riesterer:
If you’re in the training business, you’re trying to persuade people to learn certain concepts, but kind of where I’m coming from is this idea that even before the pandemic, 70% of sellers were selling remotely. And so they were getting pretty comfortable actually with this idea of engaging on social media and prospecting through things like LinkedIn, and I’m doing email phone calls and the occasional web conference. So the stats we have from sellers is 70% of their time when they were engaging with prospects or customers, they were already doing it remotely. So the question really became when the pandemic happened, what was going on in that other 30% and now what happens? And so this is the area that I want to talk about today is this other 30%, because this is the moment that is sort of scaring or freaking out salespeople. They protected about 30% of their sales cycle for face to face meetings.

Tim Riesterer:
And those were the big deal meetings, the moments of truth, the finals presentation, the opportunity to get all the buying influences in the same room and build consensus. This was, this is what salespeople went into Salesforce. They would get in the room and they would razzle, dazzle the client. And, and this is where they did their best work, but now it all went virtual. So the very moment they thought they were going to be the most distinctive and the most memorable had now relegated them from being the star in the room to just this little. And I don’t know if I’m up in that corner in your box or whatever, but just now they’re in a box. Like think of them. They’re like a mime in a box. And, and, and the presentation now sort of takes center stage. So when we surveyed salespeople, it’s no wonder that that actually 70% of sellers said they do not feel that virtual can be as effective in these moments as live in person.
Tim Riesterer:
So something has to give. And as I mentioned, here’s, here’s really the challenge you are now here, and that’s not where you normally were in the room and what’s taking up the space. In fact, our research shows that 83% of sellers use effectively PowerPoint slides, uh, in their virtual presentations. And that’s now the hero of the story, because visually that is the thing that has to create capture, keep sustained attention and engagement and interaction. So what has to change in, in this moment, this virtual moment is, um, you need to probably change how you engage, cause you’re coming across in a way different, much more small and diminished way. And your presentation itself has to change because it’s carrying the day, the heavy lifting, if you will. And in our research, salespeople said that 90% of sellers said, I believe I should be doing something completely different in this virtual moment.

Tim Riesterer:
But 75%, I said, I’m still doing everything more or less the same. I’m using the same presentation. And I’m kind of conducting myself the same exact way. And the problem is they didn’t know what had to change. They were like, I know something to change. I don’t know what should change from that. Just keep doing the same thing. So let’s talk about what needs to change. That’s what this presentation is about. And this idea here is that it’s in this environment, this highly competitive noisy environment, um, it is making yourself more memorable that way wins. So the idea that you need to think about is that you make a presentation at point a, so you’re presentation takes place, and then there’s a lapsed time and all kinds of things can happen in between, but there’s point B where a decision is made. And so between the time of the presentation to the decision, the only way that you’re going to stand out and be different and help facilitate a decision is to make sure you are the most memorable memory drives decision and being memorable is really the goal of any presentation.

Tim Riesterer:
So that despite all the noise during the presentation and all the noise in between, when it comes to the point of decision, you are top of mind and memorable for all the right reasons. It’s literally why we call this delivering memorable virtual presentations. So let’s dive into it. So I, what I want to talk about are really three main things today that make your presentations more memorable and help you create memories that drive decisions. And that’s the ultimate goal. And the first thing we’re going to talk about is this idea of clarifying your 10%. There’s a challenge, even when you’re face to face that people don’t remember much of what you have to say. And we’re very humbled by this idea, that audiences forget most of what we say. In fact, they forget 90% of what we say two days later. And we study this using brain science and look at people’s memories just after presentations, and then go back two days later to find out what they really remember.

Tim Riesterer:
So the problem is your audiences will only remember 10% of what you have to say, and their memory is random. You don’t know exactly what 10% they’re going to remember, but the reality is you want them to remember something specifically, there’s two kinds of memories I’d really like to talk about here. And one is precision memory. This words is precision versus just memory. The idea with just as if people leave your presentation and they get the gist of what you’re saying, the problem with just is they’ll leave the presentation. And they won’t remember who said what? They’ll just remember the gist. And that means they could remember you or your competitors. What you want to do is powerfully and effectively make their memories precise so that they associate you with the specific memory you want them to take away that you believe is your distinction.

Tim Riesterer:
So when you look at a presentation like this, this is not dissimilar to a lot of presentations out there. What is the 10%? What is the most important message that people are going to take away? Again, it is going to be completely random based on who’s in the room and where they’re coming from. And when all of this is about driving a consensus decision, you want everybody to be remembering the same 10%, some slide decks, and some longer presentations get even more difficult to remember the most important message. So my first idea, big idea for you in terms of I’m making a memory that drives decision is to replace in your presentation, this idea of an agenda. And I want that now to be your 10% slide. So the idea of having an agenda is not even just showing your agenda once, but being able to repeat that throughout the presentation, but replace the idea of an agenda with the idea of 10%, one main message and three supporting points.

Tim Riesterer:
If you think about your presentation and what you, the main point you want them to remember, and the reason you’re there and the three main things that they need to consider in support of that big idea, that you’re 10%. So one way to think about finding your 10% is what was going to be your agenda. And now turn that into a main point, a something the customer will experience or an outcome they will get. And then the three main things they’re going to have to consider the three main challenges to be addressed in achieving that main outcome. And it, it, when you think about ultimately getting to your 10%, this is the driver of your presentation. Once you figure out your 10%, it now becomes the slide that they see every so often in your presentation. So let me pause for a moment here and help you with this idea, because most people are probably thinking what’s my 10%, where do I find my 10%?

Tim Riesterer:
How do I know when I got my 10%? So I’m going to draw a Venn diagram because what good presentation or consulting engagement, doesn’t have a Venn diagram. And in this Venn diagram, you need to think of one circle being your customer and one circle being you. And one circle being your competition. What’s interesting about this Venn diagram versus most is the important meeting in the middle is actually a danger zone. If you tell a story that is important to your customer and you can solve for that thing, that’s important to them. But so can your competitor, you’ve just told a story that puts you at parody and puts you at risk of just sort of memory that everybody’s more or less the same. I get the gist of what this category is trying to tell me. The ideal is that your 10% is found in this wedge right here. This is what we call the value wedge.
You don’t want to give the whole pie

Tim Riesterer:
In your presentation yet. Just want to give them the peace and the peace you want to give them is the piece that’s important to the customer that it solves for an important need, challenge, threat problem, or missed opportunity. It’s unique to you. And it’s competitively defensible that you can
And position herself as having an advantage

Tim Riesterer:
Or a distinction from your competitors. That’s how you get precision memory. And it’s memorable because it’s important to the customer. It solves a distinctive problem, challenge, threat, and achieves a key outcome. And you do it in a way that is distinctive or unique to you and completely defensible against the competition. And that is your 10%, even in your presentation, if you have to address a few other things, you want to keep coming back to that 10% and make your presentation, anchor that entire agenda on the key outcome and the three things you do distinctly to solve for that and achieve that outcome, your value wedge. So the idea then is you, you get the main idea and then the three elements of your value wedge to tell the story. And the 10% slide becomes something they see repeatedly throughout the presentation. As you go from section to section, you bring that back, continually reinforcing the main outcome and your three distinctives in the 10% message. Some people get fancier and create slides that are prettier and the main message there. And one, two, three supporting points. And then you, um, animate them, gray them out, highlight them as you go through your presentation. And you can just start to see that these become very simple, very memorable, very repeatable sort of presentations.
I would tell you that if you aren’t even sure,

Tim Riesterer:
A designer that you should create a 10% slide that repeats and is distinct from, and that’s the key it’s distinct from most, every other slide in your deck, even if it had to be straight up text, you’ve got the main message. And then you’ve got the three here. And then as you go through the presentation, you’ll highlight the one you’re talking about. And then as you go to the next section, you move and highlight the next one. And you keep bringing back that slide, even just a simple text slide, which is different from everything else would help your main message be memorable. It would repeat your 10%. So what I’m saying here is you need to know your 10% find your value wedge, turn that into the main outcome with your three distinct supporting points and set that up as the agenda for the rest of your presentation.

Tim Riesterer:
And you repeat your 10%. You repeat your 10%. You repeat your 10%. We’ve got research that shows that in some ways you should be repeating that 10% slide, for sure, like every five minutes, we’ve done stuff where we’ve tested it. Like every minute you have that main message, like memory drives decisions, memory drives decisions every minute dipped in and out of your messaging, and it will distinctly help the precision memory of your distinctive story. So the first thing of the three is you need to find and clarify your 10%, the key main message, and then the three supporting points. And remember they live in the value wedge. That’s important to the customer, but unique and advantage to you and defensible against the competition. If you start burying that wedge in the rest of the pie, where you’re similar to the competition, the customer goes away thinking, you know, more or less everybody in this category seems to be kind of the same and you’ve lost precision memory.

The second big idea I want to share with you,
The view is this idea of controlling focus. So once you’ve got the 10%, the other thing you have to recognize is that people’s attention is all over the place. If you’re in the room and standing there again, your razzle-dazzle, you can keep their attention and you can actually see if you’ve got their attention. You don’t always see if you’ve got everybody’s attention when you’re presenting in here and you’re you’re in a box. So the idea is you want to make sure you are controlling their focus so that they are hearing your message and hearing your story is exactly you want them to what’s the problem with this slide right here. So this is an average slide, couple of bullet points, clever stock photography. This is actually a very pretty slide with a, um, with a main message and, and three supporting points. The problem is that you aren’t controlling their focus.

Tim Riesterer:
I could be, as I’ve been talking here, your eyes have been scanning all over the place. And, and, and let’s just say, I presented this slide and I was introducing this slide in these three points. You can see people are focusing not where I’m talking and on what I’m talking about, the focusing where they want to focus it. Part of our brain science that we do is we do EEG ECG. So electro, um, uh, the, the, the helmets that you see in people’s heads, the eye tracking devices, the galvanized skin response, electrocardiographic, um, um, uh, technology and we’re watching and, and, uh, checking and managing and monitoring what they’re doing. And this presentation, people were obsessed with bullet point. Number two, what’s the problem? Well, maybe you’re just unbelief point number one, and you don’t want them obsessing with bullet point. Number two, the problem is people read way faster than you talk.
Tim Riesterer:
And you’ve got some main points you want to make, but they’ve already read ahead and they’ve run. Their conclusions are not even hearing your points. The first thing I would like to teach you about controlling focus is simply use the build functionality in PowerPoint, make your bullets build this. Isn’t even a hard thing, but it’s amazing how many people’s slides go up and everything’s on there and you’ve lost your audience because they’ve read ahead and they’ve made up their mind and they’ve lost all the subtlety, nuance and main points you were trying to make and build this as you tell the story, because as I build it, I know exactly where you’re looking at this moment. So controlling focus is, is paramount in this environment here where you want people to pay attention to the thing you’re talking about at the moment you’re talking about it.

Tim Riesterer:
So this is a typical slide that shows up in a lot of business presentations, and then you start talking about it and nobody knows where they’re supposed to look, and you don’t know where they’re looking, but you have a main point to make, as you go through this animation is just a simple technique to break up a complex idea and make it simple and concrete. As I animate this visual and talk about it, I know exactly where your eyes are going, and they’re going exactly where I want them to go. And you’re hearing exactly what I want you to hear at that moment no more, no less. And certainly most importantly, you’re not getting ahead of me and making a determination that may not be correct about what I’m trying to say. And you’re not missing maybe the most important moment that I have at a certain point.
Tim Riesterer:
So build the functionality for bullet points, animation for complicated images like this. I’m not saying don’t have complicated images. Sometimes your industry just needs this to be up and needs to be talked about, but do something to control their focus. So they don’t miss the most important points you need to make throughout. Maybe colors your friend. Here’s another image. And just think how complicated this is and how little control you have over anybody’s focus. But now just think about graying, some stuff out and keeping certain parts colored while you’re making a presentation. And I know again exactly where you’re looking and you’re looking where I want you to look and listening to what I want you to listen to about that thing. While I’m talking about it, controlling focus is so important in this compete, highly competitive environment, the multitasking environment that is virtual. And the other thing that’s happening is they’re seeing lots of movement.

Tim Riesterer:
One of the techniques I use and you’ve seen me use it is this idea of, as I did earlier, um, uh, you are in a box. I, I am notated a visual because now the sudden you don’t know what’s happening. You don’t know what’s happening next. And I’ve created some sort of, uh, engagement to talk more about what’s on the visual, engaging the visual and getting you to, to focus exactly where I want you to focus. In fact, if I was in a dialogue with a couple of people in a sales pitch right now, I would say, okay, um, what I’d like to hear now is how you feel about these big ideas that we just shared. And I would start to take notes right on the screen, because then as people talk and they start to tell me what they’re thinking, I capture that.
Tim Riesterer:
And as I’m capturing that, they’re seeing that I’m hearing them. And not only are they seeing that I’m hearing them in real time, they can correct me if they’re like, Oh wait, no, no, no. What I really meant to say was, was blah-di-blah I can capture that. And now you’ve built engagement. Now you’ve got dialogue. Now it’s going back and forth because they can see their words being captured and they want to ensure they’re being captured correctly. And they know you are taking important notes, grasping what they’re saying. And, and hopefully by taking your notes and annotating, you’re making them feel like they’re part of the process. So annotation is a powerful force that you should use to control focus, perhaps the most powerful. And as I mentioned earlier, what’s interesting is 83% of salespeople use PowerPoint as their visual tool. Um, a large percentage use no visual, but, and then a very small percentage, 3% use white boarding like I’m doing right now.

Tim Riesterer:
So if you want an opportunity to be differentiated from pretty much everybody else who’s presenting consider introducing a little white boarding into your presentation, you will differentiate yourself from 97% of all the other presenters out there. Remember being memorable is really important. And the power of white boarding, as I talked about it earlier, is I could probably draw these again and here could tell me exactly what goes in these three buckets, the customer, you, the competitor. And I whiteboard it and got to a very simple concept called the value wedge, but it was a simple concept, but it was for a very complicated idea, which is finding, knowing and controlling your 10%. And I did that with just a simple redraw, double retainable image that appeared or revealed itself to you and, and also broke up the monotony of PowerPoint slides. There’s a scientific concept called habituation and people habituate to slides after a while.
Tim Riesterer:
And they kind of think they know exactly what’s going to happen next, because too many of you use these really tight templates that your company thought was going to help you look consistent, but only causes people in a virtual setting to habituate and know exactly what’s going to happen next. Even if something different appears on this slide, they’re pretty much sure. They think they know what’s going to happen. And they don’t. Aren’t able to tell a concept from another concept because you’ve forced them into a one size fits all slide template. So our intentions are good for consistency, but our instincts are off because you just habituated your audience into basically, um, uh, into going to sleep on your presentation. And the power of PowerPoint is you gotta maximize the utility of the tools in PowerPoint, but every now and again, you got to think about how to distinguish yourself.

Tim Riesterer:
And I give you the white boarding and annotating as a way to really set yourself apart in this environment. And don’t do it the whole time, because then it’s no longer distinctive either. So it’s a real opportunity to just wake up the brain spark and recapture and spike that attention. Again, those of you who are using no visuals who think this is the way to go. I think that’s an opportunity every now and again, to turn off your slides and make your picture come up bigger on the screen, like eventually get in their face, tell a personal story, but then go back to the visuals. But using no visuals is absolutely destroying your opportunity. Be memorable because everybody’s a visual learner. I don’t care what you’ve been taught about how learning styles work in this environment. Everybody is a visual learner. If they’re not, it literally means that something’s wrong with their cognitive function.
Tim Riesterer:
So I would, I would, I would believe that most of the people you’re talking to in a B2B setting, no matter what you think of your customers, um, have fine cognitive function and need visuals. So I want to do a little a, I’m going to do a little chat here. Uh, we’d love for you guys to chat me up a little bit, um, pick from one of these and just type it in the chat of these techniques to control focus that I just showed you, which of these would, would you be thinking is most usable to you? Um, and most impactful, if you would start doing it tomorrow instead of what you’re doing. So if you don’t mind putting it in the chat box, animations builds colors, annotating whiteboards. Awesome. What I’m seeing is a lot of annotation in whiteboards and a lot of all of them, because a lot of us put PowerPoint slides up with bullets that don’t ever get built.

Tim Riesterer:
Um, great. It, and I love the combination of all of them people are saying, because that’s true. Again, habituation is a real thing. And in this environment you have to do something, um, PA um, animation and color are great for those complex visuals. Cause you can’t draw those. Trust me, I can’t whiteboard architectures. Um, but you’ve got to do something other than show it to them. So, uh, awesome. And people being flexible. Yeah. If you can get fluent at a number of these, I hope you’re experiencing it now that you’re experiencing something really different and you can do these things. These are, uh, I know the question is going to come up. At some point, people are wondering, what am I doing to annotate and to, um, highlight and take notes. I simply have, this is not a commercial, but I have a Lenovo ThinkPad.

Tim Riesterer:
I’m not a Mac user. Uh, I use a ThinkPad and I have a built in stylist with a touchscreen. All I’m doing is I have my PowerPoint slides open and full screen here. And I am annotating on top of my PowerPoint slides. You don’t even have to learn an app. This is just writing and drawing on top of the slide. You do need a touch screen of some sort, but seek that out because you can see now how, what a difference maker can be. So memory drives, decision, precision memory, more precisely drives decision. So you need to clarify your 10% and then you need to control the focus on the things you want them to specifically remember. And here at the time you’re doing it. So using color animation and annotation and white boarding to reveal the story, not just work it all out and wonder if they’re paying attention to the right thing at the right time.

Tim Riesterer:
So I’m going to try and get to some of your questions here at the end. So I’m going to take the next few minutes to talk about the third thing and then bring Sarah back on and do some Q and a with you, uh, the third thing to make memories that drive decisions. And that again is your goal, right? Presentation at point a decision at point B, you need to be memorable to drive decisions. Decisions is you need to, in your presentations, do something to prime the brain. Uh, and the thing about people moving into a screen environment like this is they have high expectations for the kinds of things that they normally do on screens. And so now your presentation, your business presentation is in a similar environment as what is mostly their entertainment. And, and even if they don’t overtly and consciously say this subconscious, this consciously, we know there’s an increased threshold for stimulation.

Tim Riesterer:
It’s literally called the stimulation threshold and audiences stimulation threshold is going up, up, up and the numbers. We still haven’t fully dialed in the numbers, but suffice it to say, we think it’s somewhere. I know this is a wide range, but you need two to five times the amount of movement, the amount of animation, the amount of, of something happening on the screen to keep people engaged, to get over the stimulation threshold. So that’s what you’ve been seeing me doing a lot of is recognizing I have to get over the stimulation threshold. So it’s interesting is I recently had to do a presentation where somebody said, you only have 30 minutes and keep it to 10 slides. And I want to keep it to 10 slides. I mean, what I know is I got 30 minutes in a virtual environment and I’ve got to have two to five times the amount of like motion and movement.

Tim Riesterer:
And what I told them is I’m going to have 30 minutes and I’m going to have 30 slides, but they’ll never know I making arbitrary rules about the number of slides in a presentation is a completely misguided recommendation. So if any of you are hearing that or giving that it is another good intention, but it is the totally wrong instinct. People need motion and movement to be engaged. And the key is that you need good messaging and that it’s focused and that you repeat it in a way that’s interesting and recaptures and captures and captures again, or spikes their attention. It’s not about the slide count, got to get that out of your head. So one of the tools then for priming, the idea of priming is just before you want to say something really important that you really want people to remember. You use some tools to like get them engaged again.

Tim Riesterer:
So I ask you a chat question here, and I got everybody chatting and now Holy cow, it’s like hundreds of chats. Um, by the way, there’s 2000 people who signed up for this presentation. So thank you very much. Um, but Chad is a great way to get people to engage if you get larger audiences, especially, um, and, uh, even in sales presentations, or if you’re training, you have large audiences using the chat functionality is become just part of our norm, but don’t wait for them to chat. You ask proactively to get people involved them chatting so you can get a feel for what everybody’s saying, thinking and believing. But I’m going to, I’m going to tell you that polling like Sarah did earlier is an interesting technique to consider I’m here. I’m not as worried about this, but if I had, let’s say seven decision makers in the room at one of my most important prospects.

Tim Riesterer:
And I know that there’s one really dominant steals the show and everybody, you know, is afraid to speak. When that person’s in the room. And I start asking questions, everyone’s going to defer to the one person and the one person is going to dominate, and I’m not going to get a feel for the room. And I think about selling anymore, as it takes multiple decision makers in consensus to make a decision. So you, as the seller, what are you going to do to find out and take the pulse of the room? Well, if you ask in a chat, these people are still afraid to possibly say anything that contradicts the boss or the big mouth. And the beauty of a pole is you can get everybody to answer and they can answer anonymously. And as a seller, this is like gold taking a poll on an important question.

Tim Riesterer:
Gotcha. And getting a feel for the room in an anonymous sort of way, the way for you to determine how close you are to the all important thing you need as a seller, which is consensus. And you start to see disparate answers. You realize I got some work to do, and guess what? The team realizes we’ve got some work to do, and guess what happens? Then you can start working on that. You can start asking. So what are some of the questions? What should we be working on? What should we be looking at? What are some of the concerns? And, uh, so the I, the power in, in a virtual room is even greater than an alive room where everybody’s really minding in their P’s and their accused. If somebody is important in the room and they differ, here’s a chance for you to take a temperature, because what you don’t want after the presentation is five people going and sabotaging this thing.

Tim Riesterer:
Cause they weren’t on the same page. You want to get people on the same page and this is a tool to do it, but it’s also a priming tool. Cause everybody’s in the game again, they’re commenting there, adding, they’re responding. They’re looking at the poll. They’re curious because they’re, you know, they’re, they’re voyeuristic. Everybody wants to know what their peers are thinking. So this is a powerful priming tool, another powerful priming tool. Here’s something I want to do with it’s really different. So for a second, I want to get not digital with you. I would like each of you to grab a paper and a pen. Now I know some of you might not have that handy, but look around for a scrap of paper and a and a pen. And I want you to draw something with me. I want you to draw three boxes, progressively, um, bigger boxes as they go along.

Tim Riesterer:
So you see them going in ascending order there. So draw three boxes with me in the first box. I want you to write the words. Listen, only we did an experiment recently in a virtual selling situation where we did a simulation where we created the same story and the same talk track with the same voiceover. And we had a cohort listen to the message only. And then like they were on a phone call, right? We had them imagine you’re on a phone call with a sales rep. And then we had him answer some questions afterward. There was another group that listen to the same exact message and voiceover, same exact words and watched some visuals. So they watched essentially a PowerPoint. So right. Watch visuals in the second box. And today we’ve shown you that the goal is to make sure that you really distinguish yourself and make yourself more memorable through your visuals.

Tim Riesterer:
And that people do remember more. It’s called the picture superiority effect. There’s real science to that. And if you haven’t heard of it, you can look it up. There’s no less than probably three dozen studies on the picture. Superiority effect. Why adding a picture increases people’s ability to remember your core messages, but the third group, you’re probably wondering what goes in this third box. I want you to write the words draw along. So the third group listened to the same message watched the same visuals, but were then specifically instructed to draw along at a key point in the presentation and capture what was being said and described on the screen they were watching. And that group then was surveyed as well afterwards. So three cohorts listening to the exact same words, same message, same length, one listening, only one listening and watching. And one cohort listening, watching, and drawing along.

Tim Riesterer:
Now I want you to write three numbers, 14, 12, and 10. These are really important numbers because afterward we asked each group the same questions. So we asked them in the listen only mode and the watch and listen, and the draw. How different was his presentation? How unique was this compared to other business presentations? You see the ones who drew along rated how different and unique the presentation was 14% higher. Why is this important? Because one of the things you want to be in this environment, when you’re all in a box, right? You’re all in a little box. If you want to be different, you want to be different in order to be memorable and speaking of memorable, next to 12, right? To present their memory, they remembered and were more confident in being able to retell the story by on average 12%. And the third one is very important.

Tim Riesterer:
We ask them how convinced are you that you have a problem that you need to solve? And then we said, how convinced are you that this vendor has a solution? Give us a score. And every one of these, like that was on the range of one to 10. The people who listened to watched and drew along were 10% more convinced they had a problem needed solving and 10% more convinced on average that the vendor had a appropriate solution. They were 12% more able to remember and retell the story. And they saw the presenter. The vendor, the presentation is 14% more different and unique. And remember they only watched one of these. They were just comparing it to their general experience in watching business presentations. Cause I want you to think about this for a second. Hopefully you’ve captured this with me. Eventually your presentation goes away and they go back to work.

Tim Riesterer:
They go back to emails and everything else. And the question is, what are they going to remember? What are they going to take away? And I want to offer to you this idea that maybe just, maybe you want to add a little friction. People are worried about this idea of, Oh my gosh, I would never do this. I don’t want to add friction to the conversation. We’ll actually add in a little friction, causes people to process more, to, to embed what you want them to remember deeper and asking them to do it is different. It makes it more memorable and more convincing. So why, why wouldn’t you do it? Because now when I’m done here today, you’re going to look at that and you’re going to have that, that, and it’s going to walk the halls. If you were still back in an organization where you’re meeting and buildings, you would walk the halls and pressing your friends with this study.

Tim Riesterer:
And, and you could, because it was simple enough to draw simple enough to remember and simple enough to retell. But it’s a core concept I want you to leave with today is asking people to draw along is potentially an adding friction potentially really important to differentiating and making yourself more memorable and driving more convincing decisions in your favor after you’re done, I’m just going to give you an interesting example. We worked with a company that sold fireplaces. So I don’t know where you all live, but many of you probably have a fireplace in your house. This was a company that sells fireplaces and they were trying to increase the number of fireplaces that new home builders would put in their house. So on average, um, five out of 10 home builders were putting a home buyers. We’re putting a fireplace in their new home. And so they wanted to increase that penetration, that incidence rate, they wanted more people to be buying fireplaces.

Tim Riesterer:
We designed a simple draw along exercise for them. So their salespeople, when talking to the home, the builder like you and I were building a home and now the salesperson from the home builder, right, is asking us, they said, Hey, take out a pen and write down these three numbers. One 710 and four. These numbers tell a story and then they would, they would tell the person writing it down. So the number one here is this idea that a fireplace has consistently voted the number one indoor feature that home buyers and home owners think about when they think about their favorite indoor feature, the number 710 here is really important. It’s not really 710. It’s seven out of 10, seven out of 10 home buyers. So let’s say someday, you’re about to sell your home because you want to trade up or you’re downsizing, but you want to sell your home.

Tim Riesterer:
Seven out of 10 home buyers say it is a must have, it’s a non negotiable. So if you don’t have a fireplace, not only do not have the number one indoor feature, you’ve reduced your potential home buying population to only three out of 10 buyers who are on the fence about this four, four is the percent of people who put premium fireplaces in. So here the opportunity is, do you want to distinguish or differentiate your home when it goes on the market from 96% of all the other homes who have fireplaces and just have a standard 96% of them have standard fireplaces. Here’s an opportunity you to differentiate what happened afterward? Well, afterward we basically, that was it. It was three numbers and a little story. The incidents rate went from five to seven out of 10 homes. We’re now putting fireplaces in 40% increase.

Tim Riesterer:
And all they did is have the customer draw along a symbol, little what we call number play. And the number of premium fireplaces went from 4% to 40% of new home buyers. New home builders were putting in a premium fireplace. That’s like a 400% increase in the share of wallet. And the only thing that changed was asking the customer to write some things down, take ownership of the story. If you had written this down and some of you right now who don’t have a fireplace in your home, even if you live in Southern Florida, like shoot, right? I mean, now you can’t literally unsee this. You can’t unhear this as a customer. It really leaves an indelible imprint. And so I want you to consider adding friction by asking your customer to write something down or draw something along that solidifies a main point of your presentation, even in this virtual environment here.

Tim Riesterer:
And I want you to use your chat again and write the word red, yellow, or green are, how willing are you now to consider asking somebody to draw along after what you’ve heard? So I’m seeing mostly green, a couple yellows. Thanks for being honest. Um, it’s not a natural move. I’ve had many, a sales team say I ain’t going to do it. And I’m like, well, here’s the data I ain’t going to do it. So thanks for that. A lot of green and yellow, depending on audience, absolutely a green with a tad of yellow. I don’t know what that makes on the spectrum, but I’m thinking it’s a frog. Um, but this is, uh, uh, it’s all about having the correct numbers. Yeah, this is, this is my challenge to you. Figure out what your 10% is and, and, um, and then create a little number, play out of your 10%, put some numbers to it and ask the person, you know, tell the person these numbers, tell a story.

Tim Riesterer:
It. So first things first get your 10% and, and then think about a way to have the customer actually with you draw or capture your, your 10%. And thank you for the Wisconsin. People who said green and yellow or the green Bay Packers. Um, just I know for the people in India and, uh, and where else did I see the UK and everywhere else in the world? They’re like, there’s only one form of football and it ain’t yours. I appreciate that. Um, all right. So thank you for that awesome answers. Awesome participation. Here’s my offer to you, you know, here’s the, the thing is, is you don’t sit around and fear being disrupted, uh, you know, be the disruptor. And I think being the disruptor in a, um, in a sales presentation, that’s virtual, we’re, all of us are in a tiny little box and our PowerPoint decks all start to look and sound, frankly, just frankly, smell the same.

Tim Riesterer:
There’s an opportunity for you to distinguish yourself by priming the brain with chat, uh, getting people involved polls to anonymously, see where your consensus is or isn’t, um, and then asking people to actually draw along or write something down with you that totally primes the brain. What’s going to happen here. And I’m going to have a, I’m going to have a lovely, parting gift after this presentation, as you do today. So three big ideas to make sure that, you know, that memory drives a decision point, a presentation point B decision. Your presentation has to be memorable and it has to be precisely memorable. And the way you do that is by identifying, knowing, clarifying, simplifying your 10%, find your value wedge and lean into that. And literally, as you’ve seen this slide, my 10% slide is this very slide right here. I want you to remember that memory drives decisions and your number one goal for your presentations is to be memorable.

Tim Riesterer:
And there are effectively three supporting points for that clarify, the 10% control the focus, make sure they’re looking and hearing and listening and paying attention to exactly what you want them to, and then find a way to prime the brain and get them engaged in a way that they’re going to remember exactly what you want them to remember at the moment of truth. So, uh, that’s what I have to say to them. I’m going to, I’m going to bring this up, um, because it’s a free tool kit. Um, we will send these slides out. Uh, there is a recording of this presentation in case you want to share this. My goal was to give you specific tools that you can literally use tomorrow to affect change and make your presentations more memorable because memory drives decisions and give you a kit, a simple kit that’s free to you.

Tim Riesterer:
So if you go to this link, you can download an infographic that reminds you of the big points. We have a ebook chock full of more science backed, um, brain study back, uh, concepts for how to make your content more memorable and an overview of a course that we teach on mastering, remote selling. So take your time to go there and get some additional free resources. Take a picture of this if you want. Um, and Sarah I’ve left some time for some questions, so I’m going to bring it back to you and, uh, and turn it over to really what the audience wants to hear.
Sarah Gallo:
Perfect. Thanks so much tin. All right. We do have quite a few questions. Um, let’s see. We had multiple people wondering, um, what kind of tools you were using in terms of, um, annotation. I know you mentioned a little bit about that, but if you could dive a little bit deeper into that, that would be great.

Tim Riesterer:
Yeah. There are tools out there. No doubt. There are apps out there. Um, one that our like to use is something called, explain any, explain everything, explain everything. So it’s an app that does a lot more than just allowing you to annotate and whiteboard. It does some really cool screen capture things. It can dig into your slide library and allow you to pull things out. Um, it’s a great note taking technique. So people are putting that on their, on their screens or they’re plugging in getting an adapter for their iPad. Uh, for again, for me, this is a basic laptop I’m using. It is as basic and industrial as it gets. And they all now anymore, these days have touch screens and they have a stylist built right in. And I just simply click on the tray, change my colors and change my size of my, um, tip or font and, uh, annotate right on the PowerPoint slide.

Tim Riesterer:
And I feel like that’s, that’s like the most basic, and that’s why I wanted to show it and show you how powerful it can be. Um, it’s not asking anybody to learn an app. It’s really just asking them to sketch. And hopefully sometimes, you know, you or your sellers have been in a room and you’ve flipped charted things. You’ve white boarded things. And this just gives you the freedom and flexibility to do that. And I would encourage it because if you really think about it, slides are important and they gotta be right. But the thing that conveys ownership of the concepts and the thing that creates engagement back and forth and, and shows that you’ve got consultative skills, I think is the ability to annotate add value to the content. And sometimes on a blank screen, add some value through whiteboards or great note-taking, um, very powerful opportunity that, uh, and again, only 3% of people admit to doing that. That will distinguish you instantly from everybody else in virtual presentation land.

Sarah Gallo:
Perfect. Thanks, Tim. And your next question is from Diane, who said she’s not in sales, but she is in the L and D field and is trying to convince her learners to make the switch from in-person learning to virtual learning, but she’s having some pushback. She wants to know if you have any tips for creating, um, engaging virtual delivery methods that can kind of help her gain that buy in to make that switch.

Tim Riesterer:
Yeah. And that’s a great question. And I know this is training industry.com. So I assume a lot of you are trainers. So one, I was hoping that you would think about how you can help your sellers cause your job is to train your sellers to be better. Now they’re in a new moment and they’re freaking out. So here are some ideas you can give them. Um, you were, you saw me try to teach you using the tools I would recommend you use to teach in a virtual environment, the idea of, of 10% controlling focus and creating interaction and priming, uh, with the tools I shared are exactly the same things you should use in a virtual training environment. And, um, here’s the thing I, I know that people used to be against virtual training. Uh, but now we all are in virtual training land. Uh, so my company used to run like 120 classroom a month.

Tim Riesterer:
We train 30,000 sellers every year, we were doing 120 classroom events a month. And literally in March, we went to zero. We are now on average doing 300 virtual classrooms a month. That’s how this thing has pivoted. And most companies are going, you know what? I don’t have to wait for a classroom to open up. I don’t have to wait for my date on a calendar anymore. So I’m not, I don’t have to wait 12 months out to get my new skills. I can get them now. So the whole idea is getting your skills now so that you can have greater impact the rest of the year versus waiting for your name to come up on a calendar. So the idea of scale and, and getting effective learning right away is catching on. We had one company that had scheduled two dozen training events, live training events between April and July.

Tim Riesterer:
We’re now doing 250 for them. So I think now’s the time. And here’s the thing about sellers. If you’re talking about sellers, they never wanted to take time out of the field anyways. And so we’ve done well. We’re seeing people actually say with a four to one preference, Hey, this is a really good use of my time. Um, and, and I don’t have time to explain some of the other things we do with fluency challenges, where people have to do an online assignment and that gets, um, detailed coaching and written feedback, but there are ways, uh, and I’d be happy to take that offline if you, um, find me on LinkedIn and shoot me a note. I can tell you more, send you an ebook on how to make virtual better with outcomes than live training. It’s possible.

Sarah Gallo:
Perfect. Your next question is from Lydia, who wants to know if there’s any specific features you recommend using, um, within PowerPoint to make presentations more engaging, or if there’s any, um, you have maybe used for this purpose?

Tim Riesterer:
Yeah, certainly. And I tried to call them out. Um, and in the course we teach, we actually have modules and then mini modules within it to talk specifically about, for example, builds PowerPoint builds the idea that if you, I had an 45 minute hour, 45 minute presentation and I had 70 slides in there and you probably didn’t even notice it, but within most of my slides, I had three to five animations. So if you think about it, 70 times three is over the course of 40 minutes or so that was 210 significant moves just in the slides that doesn’t even count the drawing in the annotating and everything that I did. And so again, less is not more, um, so, uh, but key is, uh, the build animate function. So making sure your visuals are chunked so that you can animate them and then the sales person, or you just click, click, click, and these things animate, and it looks like a progressive story, right? So learn your build and animate function learn simply how to color things, um, gray things out, make other things color. When you want people to focus on the things with color, um, size. I didn’t even talk about size font size, really important. Like you want something to be focused, make a site then that big, that thing gets bigger, like zoom in on an image or a couple of key words. And of course you can annotate to focus that as well. And these are all functional, easily done in pretty basic PowerPoint skills.

Sarah Gallo:
Your next question is from Daraa, who wants to know if you have any tips for incorporating storytelling into the virtual presentation experience?

Tim Riesterer:
Yeah. And, you know, storytelling is one of those things where everybody’s got an opinion on what storytelling is. Um, if we’re talking about just a construct of framework, like a story arc, uh, people talk about like the hero’s journey, um, and the idea of how you need to show how the world is changed so that people can’t believe they, they don’t believe they can stay in their status quo and they need to reconsider. And then they, you know, they, you show them the ways to re um, to resolve that risk or that change or that problem. So there’s a story arc way of telling story to, uh, storytelling, storytelling, personal storytelling, where you add a personal story. At some point in B2B, I like personal stories to be like personal stories of how you’ve worked with someone like them. I think sometimes we can actually overdo the personal storytelling about ourselves.

Tim Riesterer:
That’s gotta be done really well, not to be narcissistic and not to be boring to everybody listening. Cause the truth is, everybody else is thinking about themselves. So when you tell a personal story about how you help someone like them, it’s personal because it’s expertise that, you know, so you’re, you’re, you’re elevating your consultative abilities in their eyes. They’re connecting with the story cause they’re seeing themselves in the story, which is what they want to do anyways. And it’s keeping them focused on pop your 10%, if your own personal personal story does not reinforce your 10%, it may be the only thing they remember. You may make them cry. You may make them laugh, but now you made them made that the random memory that they take away, not the 10%. So, uh, this is very, very important that you’re careful with stories. We do a lot of research in terms of story arcs.

Tim Riesterer:
If you’re doing something to acquire new business or a new logo, you need to have a very disruptive story arc that defeats their status quo bias, causes them to see the need to change. But if you’re talking to an existing customer and you want them to renew with you and keep going with you, you actually have to defend your incumbent advantage, reinforce all the goodness that you’ve done together. You don’t try to defeat status quo bias when you are in the status quo bias. So storytelling has so many angles on it. I hope I covered a few there. Um, and they are important. Um, and when used, well,

Sarah Gallo:
Perfect. I think we have time for one last question. This one’s from late Tita who wants to know how long you would suggest preparing for a one hour presentation,

Tim Riesterer:
Uh, again, by preparing, preparing your slide deck and your animations, annotations and all that, or preparing like yourself to deliver a one hour presentation. Um, and, and that’s a good question. It’s hard for me to know any more, cause I will tell, uh, I’ll tell this story when we give assignments. So when we teach people this mastering remote selling class, and these are three, I gave you three of the six concepts we teach in that class, but we go into much more depth than everything else. We ask them to build a presentation and then record themselves delivering that presentation. They upload it and they’ve voiced it over and they capture themselves on a screen capture. And then we give them feedback. Our system, um, can detect how many times they recorded themselves before they hit the submit button. And on average, we see that people record themselves 6.3 times before they’re confident to hit the submit button.

Tim Riesterer:
I would tell you that, uh, too many people wing it. And so I love this idea that people did essentially six and a half dry runs before they appeared. Um, that’s gotta be a minimum. I would think at some level to get some level of proficiency on the story, know when to let it breathe, know how to engage the audience, understand your transitions, where your builds are and how to continually reinforce your 10% like memory drives, decision, make your stories memorable. Right? So, um, anyways, I hope that that practice is essential. You can’t take a quiz and say you’re a great presenter. And uh, so that’s the tool I would recommend. I’ll just use that as a rule of thumb six and a half times fully through before you go live.

Sarah Gallo:
Perfect. Well, thank you so much, Tim, for a great presentation today.

Tim Riesterer:
You’re welcome. Thanks for having me, Sarah.

Sarah Gallo:
All right. At this point, I would like to invite you all for a few of our other upcoming webinars. This month, you can register for these programs and watch past webinars
at trainingindustry.com. All of our webinars are also pre-qualified for a credit hour by SHRM CPTM HRCI and ISPI certification. What is CPTs? The certified professional interning management program assist you in developing the core skills and competencies needed to manage the future training needs of your company. You can participate in a number of programs, held within the U S or join us for a virtual practicum from anywhere across the globe. Learn more about the program at trainingindustry.com slash CPTM. All right, Tim, again, thank you so much for some awesome content today. A thank you also goes out to our sponsor corporate visions and of course a thank you goes out to all of you for joining us. We’ll see you next time.

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