26 Feb 2020
1:00 pm ET 60 min

The most effective leaders realize that leadership is not about them and that they are only as good as the people they lead. Leaders who are grounded in humility and focused on the greater good create organizational cultures where both people and profits grow and thrive.

In this complimentary Training Industry webinar, sponsored by Litmos, bestselling business author Ken Blanchard shares a four-step approach to building an organizational culture that leads to engaged people and improves long-term business results.

In this interactive webinar, you will explore how to:

  • Set your sights on the right target and vision by deciding who you are (purpose), where you’re going (picture of the future), and what guides your behavior and decisions (values).
  • Treat your people right, to plan performance and diagnose development level to provide the right amount of direction and support.
  • Treat your customers right by creating raving fans — customers who are so excited about the way you treat them that they want to tell everyone about you.
  • Have the right kind of leadership by teaching leaders how to move themselves to the bottom of the hierarchy, acting as a cheerleader, supporter and encourager for the people who report to them.

 

The transcript for this webinar follows:

Elizabeth Parker:
Hello, and welcome to today’s training industry webinar, creating a servant leadership culture, sponsored by litmus I’m Elizabeth Parker, marketing and event manager at training industry. And I’m very happy you could join us for today’s webinar. Before we get started, I have just a few housekeeping items to review that will help you interact with our speaker and get the most out of today’s program throughout the session today. Please feel free to chat your comments in the chat window and submit any questions you have for our speaker and your Q and a panel. And we will address them towards the end of the program. We encourage you to share the information you received today with your colleagues and network on social media. Please include the handle Litmos and leader chat and the hashtag GI webinars. So we’re able to engage with you and track your contribution to the conversation.
When the program ends, you will see that a short evaluation survey has popped open in your browser. We would greatly welcome your feedback about the content speaker in anything else you might like to share. And as always today’s webinar will be recorded and archived on training industry.com and you will receive a followup email from us with a link to the on-demand program that you can review again later and share with your team.

Elizabeth Parker:
If this is your first webinar with us, a special welcome goes out to you. At training industry, we offer near a hundred webinars every year on subjects ranging from content development, managing technologies, soft skills, training, coaching performance management. We cover just about every topic relevant to leaders of training organizations around the globe. If you’ve attended one of our events in the past, thanks so much for being with us again and now without any further ado, I am pleased to have, uh, Ken Blanchard and David Witt from the Ken Blanchard companies leading our session today. So Ken and David, I am going to hand it over to you.

David Witt:
That’s great. Thank you, Elizabeth. And welcome everyone. It’s good to have you here with us today, Ken and I are going to go ahead and just share our video with you a little bit. So, so you can see us, we’re speaking to you from the Ken Blanchard companies, uh, head San Diego, California. Uh, we’ll keep the, uh, the video on just here for Ken’s introduction and then, uh, I’ll be working in the background. So please do go ahead and submit your questions in the Q and a panel. And I’ll ask Ken your questions, uh, at the end of today’s presentation. So let me go ahead and introduce, uh, our to subject matter expert today. Dr. Ken Blanchard is the cofounder and chief spiritual officer of the Ken Blanchard companies and international leadership training and consulting firm in San Diego, California, his iconic 1982 classic. The one minute manager coauthored with Spencer Johnson has sold more than 13 million copies remains on bestseller list today. Uh, since then over the past three decades, Ken has authored or coauthored 65 books. You’ve been busy. Ken,

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
I know it’s been fun. It’s been fun.

David Witt:
Uh, the combined sales, a total of more than 21 million copies, we’re going to be looking at two of those books today, uh, leading at a higher level, some of the key concepts from that, and also servant leadership in action in 2005, Ken was inducted into Amazon’s hall of fame as one of the top 25 bestselling authors of all time. Ken, I’m going to go ahead and have, uh, Elizabeth turn our video off and then I’ll hand the mouse over to you. And if you just left click, that’ll move us onto the first slide of your presentation.

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Well, good. It’s Dave. I appreciate it. And, uh, are we ready to go?

David Witt:
We are. So if you’ll just left click on that mouse, it’ll move us over to the right. Okay.

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Okay. Here’s the agenda for today. We’re going to talk about the four keys to leading at a higher level, which is all about really creating an organization that really makes a difference in the world and for your people. We’re going to talk about understanding the importance of servant leadership, and that’ll be kind of a theme throughout. So let’s, uh, let’s get started. Uh, when we talk about the four keys to leading at a higher level, the four are setting your sights of the right target envision. Leadership’s about going somewhere else. And so that’s where we need to start. And then we talk about treating your people, right? We used to put treating your customers right second. But what I’ve really found is that the great organizations out there, they think they’re number one, customers, they’re people. And if they take care of their people, train their people love on their people.

Then they go out of their way to take care of the second most important customer. Uh, the people use their products and services, and then those people become raving fans. And, uh, that takes care of the bottom line of the people. So we put treating your people right second. Then we through treating your customers, right? And then finally having the right kind of leadership, which is all about servant leadership. And so if we look at the first key, set your sights on the right target and vision, uh, we, we talk about, uh, the quadruple bottom line and I really talked about three of them already be the employer of choice and create a motivating environment for your people. And then you’ll make sure that they create the provider of choice. You know, they’ll take care of your customers. And then that takes care of the investment of the choice.

You know, the people are interested in the bottom line and make sure everyone understands their role in making the economy company an attractive investment. And then finally, this is one that’s really come out in recent years. You want to be the corporate citizen of choice and balance the need of the stakeholders with the environment, treating everybody ethically and respectively, what are you doing to be a good citizen you’re in your environment? So that’s really key. And so there’s three of a compelling vision. I wrote a book with Jesse stoner. Who’ve been studying a vision for over 20 years and called full steam ahead, the power of, of a compelling vision. And there’s three parts we found the first is a significant purpose. What business are you in? Second is a picture of the future, which is what will the future look like if things are running as planned?

Okay. And, uh, so that that’s really important, you know, where are you headed? And then we’re going to talk about, you know, what are your values? What’s going to guide your behavior. And that’s, that’s all really kind of key. And, uh, when you look at that is all the great companies. I know David really have those three nail, for example, Disney, you know what business and Walter said, we’re well through Disney. So we’re in the happiness business so much better than being in a theme park business and it’s come come. The picture of the future is that they wanted every guest leaving one of their parks to have the same smile on their face, leaving a park as when they entered, you know, I, you know, three, six, eight, 10, 12 hours before, and then they had four very clear values. The first value is safety because of the business or in walls said, if somebody gets carried out of one of their parts on a stretcher, they wouldn’t have the same smile on their face, leaving the park as when they entered.

And then they have a, the, uh, uh, caring or all about service, you know, uh, and then the third, yeah. One is what they call the show is as you’re either on stage or off stage, you have your answers, you play your role, whether it’s speaking mouse or a ticket taker. And then finally the last value is efficiency running over well, run profitable or organization. So those are really the kind of key areas that we want to take a look at. And, uh, one of the things you have to understand where the visionary part of leadership is that it’s the responsibility of the traditional hierarchy. People look for vision and direction, uh, and they look to the leader, you know, while you should involve experienced people in shaping the vision, the ultimate responsibility remains with a leader and cannot be delegated to others. So if people don’t understand where you’re headed, you know what business you’re in, what you picture the future.

If you do a good job what’s going to happen, and what the, what are the values that guide your journey, then shame on you. It’s your fault. Uh, so that’s really so key there. So let’s just jump to the second, uh, key, which is treating your people right. As I said, the great organizations. I know they think that their people are their number one customer, uh, and if they take care of their people, they’re going to really take care of, uh, of your customer. And so, uh, Dre is a Garmin in our company who heads up our research. And my son, Scott did a lot of looking as they found. The two main components of leadership is strategic leadership, which is about mission, vision, and values, which we’ve talked about and strategic imperatives, and then operational leadership, which is about policies, processes, and systems. It’s about day to day leader behavior.

And what they found is that the biggest impact on organizational vitality, which is running a great profitable well run organization was operational leadership. Uh, 10 to 15% of the impact on that comes from strategic leadership. It’s really important. That’s gotta be done if it’s not done, you’re in trouble, but the real action is with the operational leadership, because that’s where you treat your people, right, and create what we call employee work passion. And if they’re really excited about their work, then they go out of their way to take care of your customers. Then your customer has become devoted to your organization, become raving fans. And that takes care of organizational vitality. So that’s really the key stuff. That’s the key components. And, um, uh, what you got to understand is we’re talking now about implementation. So that the first aspect of what I would call servant leadership is vision and direction.

You know, where you focus on, you know, what business are we in? Where are we headed? What are the values are going to guide our journey? And that’s the responsibility of the hierarchy, even though you involve people in that, but once that’s clear, now we move to the implementation stage. And now you turn the traditional pyramid upside down. And this is the servant part of servant leadership. The vision and direction is to leadership, part of servant leadership. So effectively Taisha requires turning the pyramid upside down. So the customer contact people are at the top of the organization and can’t be responsible. And what does that mean? Able to respond and soar like Eagles? Well, a leader serve and are responsive to the needs of employees, you know, helping them, uh, to, you know, live according to the vision and the direction. And what’s really interesting is David is, is that you can always tell an organization, run by self-serving leaders because, uh, if you got a problem with the organization and you go to a frontline employee, you know, a customer contact, a person you’re talking to a duck, they go quite crack.

It’s our policy. Quite frankly, I just work here, quack, quack. I didn’t make the freaking rules. Why rocks? You want to talk to my supervisor quack right back back. And you’re talking to ducks because they’re keeping that traditional period pyramid, uh, alive and well. So all the energy is flowing up the hierarchy, uh, where if you get a great servant leadership where they turn this thing upside down, now your customer contact people are really responsible and they can soar like Eagles, you know? And so that’s why Nordstrom’s everybody loves Northstar’s cause you got a problem there. They say, no problem. We’ll take care of it. A friend of ours went in there to get some perfume for his wife. And the woman said, I’m sorry, we don’t sell that in our store. But I know in the mall where I can get it, how long are you going to be in this story?

So about 30 minutes, she said, well, good. I’ll go and get the perfume that you want for your wife and bring it back here and gift wrapped it and charge you for it. And he couldn’t believe it, that gal left the store went back. And so when he was ready to leave the store, she had all gift wrapped and bummed believable is she’s charged him the same price that she paid in the store where she bought it. So Nordstrom didn’t make any money, but what do they make, David? They made a life time customer that’s for sure. You know? And, uh, so it makes a difference in, and I love to tell, you know, I’m a big fan of, uh, uh, Southwest airlines, you know, herb Keller and Holy Baird. And I wrote a book with Coleen called Lee with love and love is spelled L U V.

You know, because, uh, that’s, uh, that’s their stock symbol. And they started on love fields and they are there Craig warns on love lane. And then all they really talk about loving their people and all of that kind of thing. And, uh, it was interesting when I, when I travel, I put this thing around my neck, I call it my geezer, David in my itinerary, my tickets, my passport, if I needed a, you know, identification and all. So I go around the airport, what do you need? And I got it there. And one day I, uh, I loaded my geezer pouch and I left it on my desk and I’m pulling to the San Diego airport and I realized I have no official identification. Uh, and so, you know, I don’t have time to go back home and get my, my, uh, geezer pouch. So I went into the store cause the only book I’ve ever written that I have my picture on the cover is one I wrote with Don Shula, the old, my Demi Emmy dolphins coach. We wrote a book on everyone’s a coach. And luckily they had a copy in the, in the bookstore, in the airport and I grabbed it. And the first airline that I had to go to fortunately was Southwest. And they, I said, could I seek, please see your identification. I said, I apologize. I don’t have a license or a passport, but how’s this. I held the book up and he shouted out this man knows Don Shula.

I’m in first class and they’re high five in may. And there’s an older guy there. And he said, I know the security guards upstairs. I’ll get you through there, which he did. And it was unbelievable. The next day I had to fly in a different airline. And when I showed the book to them and this is one of the big airlines, my guy, the duck dude, fly to go talk to the ticket counter. I showed the woman in the teriyaki. She is quack. You better talk to my supervisor. We taught the supervisory, duct ahead, Malheur Dave. And pretty soon I’m talking to a guy in a suit and a tie. And I had to go way out of my way to convince him that I didn’t superimpose my picture on this book, but it really was being Southwest. They do assume that I didn’t do that.

Did that must be me. And so it’s really important that people understand that and you know, where it all happens, Dave, and it’s so important if we’re going to manage people, is, is that we take a look at the management, uh, performance management system, make sure it’s done the right way. So people get the right help when they need it so they can accomplish their goals. And, uh, there’s three aspects of, uh, performance planning. There’s, uh, you know, of the whole aspect. The first is performance planning when we’re talking about performance management and that’s where you set the goals and objectives and what you want people to do with a second is day-to-day coaching. And that’s when you kind of help people accomplish the goals. If you’re a great servant leader, the performance planning is that’s the responsibility of the hierarchy to make sure that people’s goals and objectives are clear.

And then when you get the day to day coaching, you turn the pyramid upside down and now you work for them. And then the final list, performance evaluation. But Dave, when I go around the world and I asked people, uh, have these three things, planning, coaching, and evaluation, where do they spend most of the time? What do you think? They say, I’ve got a sense of probably evaluation. They got all these stupid forms to fill out all that kind of thing. And, uh, so, but where the real action should be is in day to day coaching. When you turn that pyramid upside down and we’ve been lucky to work with Gary Ridge, who’s the president. And now he’s chairman of WD 40. And we have a master’s degree program at the university of San Diego on leadership. I looked at all the MBA programs and they don’t teach anything about leadership.

So we started a master of science and executive leadership, and the students come for one, three day weekend, a month for two years. And one week each summer, those of you interested in go on our website, Ken blanchard.com. And we’ll tell you about that program. But Gary was in the first session. One of the things I told Gary is when I was a college professor, I was always in trouble. Uh, because, uh, the first day of class I always gave out the final examination and the faculty would say, what are you doing? And I’d say, I’m confused and say, act did. I said, I thought we’re supposed to teach these kids. You are, but don’t give them the questions in the final. And I’d say, not only am I going to give them the questions in the final, what do you think I’m going to do all semester?

I’m going to teach them the answers. So when they get to the final exam, they get a life’s aback of getting, A’s not some stupid normal distribution curve. And Gary just loved that. You know, cause I go around the country and I say, how many of you go out and hire losers? You know, we lost all of our worst people last year. We need some good new losers to fill a low slots in the normal distribution curve. No, you either hire winners, you steal from another company or you hire people who you think have our potential winners. Uh, and uh, you know, you’re going to train them and all, so you’re not hiring a normal distribution curve. And so Gary just implemented that and, and, uh, WD 40. And I learned from Peter Drucker years ago, nothing good happens by accident, put some structure on it.

And one of the things that we taught Gary was about having one on one meetings with your people is that once the goals and objectives are, uh, clear, and the performance planning thing is then what you need to do is once every two weeks for 15 to 30 minutes, meet directly with each of your people. Uh, and, uh, the manager schedules a meeting, but the direct reports says, see, Jenna, they can talk. They might have a sick cat kid. That’s keeping them from the office or they might want to talk about one of their goals and all, but if you had 26, you know, 15 to 30 minute meetings with each of your people, uh, over a year period, which you know them and would they know you? Absolutely. And some people say, well, I don’t have time for that. You guys said, you kidding me.

Even if he had 10 employees, if you don’t have, you know, five hours every two weeks to talk to your people, then you know, you shouldn’t be a manager, go be an individual contributor. And so Gary put in this whole one-on-one process with his people and he also used the SL two, which is our situational approach to effective parenting, not parenting to effective leadership. Uh, and uh, after the goals were set, they would analyze the development level of the direct report and each of the goals and decide what was the appropriate leadership style. And then Gary implemented a really neat thing that you all might want to think about. Once a quarter, every manager gets together with their direct report, uh, and they have a report card. Remember like we used to have his kids and says, the poor question is first quarter, second quarter, third, quarter, fourth quarter, and then overall performance.

And so once a quarter, the direct report comes in and meets with their manager. And the first item of agenda, uh, Dave is, uh, is the final exam still relevant? In other words, are the goals still appropriate? A lot of times an organization is they set goals and then they file them and put them away. Then, you know, a tsunami might have, or an economic turndown. You’re not even working on those goals here. They pull those goals out and they evaluate your performance. So at WD 40, they can change their goals and objectives all the way to the beginning of the fourth quarter. And then what happens after they agree on, on where the goals are still appropriate, then the direct report gives their manager, their report guard, their preacher, their goals, they put an, a, B or C. Those there’s no D’s or F’s.

And this, the job of the manager, rather than filling out forms in your people, which I think is really stupid. Why don’t you have your people fill out the form and then you agree or disagree. And so they might give themselves an a in a particular goal and the manager might say, no, I don’t think that’s quite an a, yet. It’s a good solid B, but let’s talk about how to get her in here. They might say, no, I agree with you. That’s a really great day where somebody might rate themselves down and give themselves a C and a manager might say, it’s not a C uh, you know, I think it’s a good, solid a B let’s talk about how we can make it a, an a. And so it’s a, it’s a process and all, and I want to tell you, does this work, Dave, last time, uh, they checked the WD 40 has a 93% employee engagement score.

And then they did a survey and 99% of their people. And they’re at 35 nations said, we’d love to tell people we work for w D Ford. It’s pretty powerful. And that’s really kind of bringing alive that second secret of treating your people, right? Let’s go to the third key, which is treating your customers, right, because the customers are important, but if you could treat your people right, then they really go out of their way to take care of the customers and customer service doesn’t happen by accident. You know, leaders must make outstanding service, a top priority, and service is all about showing customers. You care about them. And we wrote a book called legendary service, which was a followup to my original book, was Sheldon balls balls called raving fans. And I wrote the, uh, the legendary service with Vicky, uh, uh, Vicky Halsy and Kathy cuff.

And, uh, what they did is they developed a care model, uh, to indicate, you know, what we wanted, if we can turn the slides here, okay, you’ll see that it starts in the lower left is the C is, are you committed to make service a number one priority? And so that’s gotta be care model starts there. And then it moves up to attentive. Uh, if you really are committed to serve your people, you need to listen to your customers. There, find out what’s important for them. And once you find out what they need know, then you move to the R, which is you you’re responsive to the needs. And you, you, uh, treat them, uh, in a way that they become raving fans of yours. And that’s all possible by you acting as if you’re empowered as if you have the right and the ability to make decisions, uh, for your people.

So the, the key is really to care, uh, and all in customer service is really important. You turn that pyramid upside down now, and all the energy is now flowing through your frontline people who are, what taking care of your customers and raving fan customers are customers who, uh, think so highly of you, uh, that they keep on bragging about you and keep on coming back to you and really be in many ways, become part of your sales force. You know, which is, I think is really, really exciting. I just love, love to see that. And that’s what, you know, what companies like Nordstrom do, and Southwest airlines and Disney and, and Wegmans in the grocery business and Synovus in the financial services, business and Starbucks, you know, and what’s also happens really in those organizations where people are empowered and excited about being there. And they take care of the customers. The turnover is really amazingly, uh, low, you know, and, uh, you know, I, I talked about the one on one sessions where we really got that is, um, Margie was working with, uh, uh, fast food chain called [inaudible].

And that the average turnover in that industry is, you know, up there 150% a year. And Margie noticed that one of the managers and, uh, and we understood, so really had a turnover low below 20%, and she couldn’t believe it. So she went and talked to the guy and said, you know, what’s your secret? He said, I don’t know. I mean, I would do anything, especially say, c’mon you gotta do. He said, well, I meet personally with every one of our employees in the two stores, once every two weeks for 15 to 30 minutes, he said, I schedule a meeting and they can talk about anything they want. And it’s so interesting, as smart as you would talk to some of these young people that they hire and why would they leave and go down the street for 50 cents more when they’re working with, with a leader who really cares about them and wants to talk to them at all 26 times a year.

And so, uh, it really is important. And when you take care of your people, uh, they feel empowered and they take care of your customers. And that’s really so important. Now let’s look at the fourth key, having the right kind of leadership, and I’ve already kind of implied with the right kind of leadership is when it’s servant leadership, you know, it’s leadership, isn’t all about you. It’s about serving the vision of the company and the people who will make it come alive. And, uh, and it’s really fabulous. You know, people say, well, where servant leadership practice, I already told you, you know, had Disney that Southwest airlines did Nordstrom’s and Starbucks Wagman’s in hall. And, you know, it was the greatest servant leader of all time. Uh, uh, Dave was a Jesus, you know, and, uh, I was on the hour of power after the woman, that manager came out and, uh, Robert Shula’s heyday. And he said, Ken, you know, it was the greatest one minute manager of all time. I said, who’s that? He said, Jesus. I said, really? He said, yeah, he was really clear on goals that you’re for.

Yeah. He said one minute goal setting. And he said, you and Tom Peterson, Yvette management, by wandering around Jesus, do you want it from one little village to another little village? Uh, and anybody show interest, he’d praise him healing in that your second secret woman who praise you that you had. And he said, you know, people stepped out of line. He wasn’t afraid to give him one minute reprimand or how we call it one minute, redirect, you know, you through the mind lenders out of the temple and said, he’s the greatest one minute manager of all time. And so I couldn’t believe it, you know? And so I have turned my back on, on faith, but then I started to read the scriptures and I left because everything that I ever did was leadership. Jesus did with these 12 incompetent guys, you hired a, you wouldn’t have hired that lot.

And so we’ve created a lead like Jesus ministry around the world, not to convert people, but just to show a great servant, uh, a leader to say the least. And, uh, you know, one of the things that we did recently is that we wrote a book called servant leadership in action. And Renee Broadwell is one of my editors worked with me. We had over 45 contributors to this book and most readings books, uh, the articles are too long. So I didn’t let anybody write an article more than six or seven pages, but do you see a head John Maxville write the foreword to the book? And he said, the only way to create great relationships and results is through servant leadership is all about putting other people first Patrick Lencioni and, and Simon Sinek, and Bernay Brown and Marshall Goldsmith and, uh, Laurie best Jones. And, you know, Jimmy Lasher was the president of Synovus and Gary Ridge, the president of WD, uh, 40, you know, I mean, just you, you name them. They were there. And, uh, because we really think that servant leadership is really the only way to really get great results and great, uh, relationships and, uh, that’s for, for sure. And, uh,

David Witt:
You know, it’s interesting, Ken, you know, people always do ask, you know, where is this actually happening, right. Where is certainly, and it’s interesting that you kind of called out some of these people who contributed to the book, Renee Brown, Simon Sinek. And again, the folks who ran large organizations like Synovus and stuff. It’s interesting folks don’t realize that they think it’s a really wow out there concept, but as you’re pointing out to us, the best companies have used exactly this approach.

Yes. And, and to get all these folks to contribute. And there were some faith-based people in their words, non-faith back. In fact, unusual thing about the book, when it first came out, it was, it was on the bestseller list, both secular books and faith based books. And, uh, so it was really things. So we think effective leadership starts in the inside, you know, are you a servant leader or self serving leader? So I ask audiences all over the world, you know, uh, how many of you want to be known as a servant leader, or would you rather be known as a self serving leader? And nobody pulls their hands up and says, I want to be a self serving leader. And yet the reality is, is there’s a lot of self serving leaders out there who think that all the brains, you know, really be, you know, against, in their offices, you know?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
And, uh, so it’s really interesting. Gordon McDonald, interesting wrote a book a number of years ago on the order of your private world. And he talked about the difference between driven leaders and call leaders and driven leaders think they own all the brains in the organization and all the decisions ought to flow through their office and all. And, uh, you know, that’s what they, they think we’re called leaders think everything is on loan. You know, it’s on loan to their people and they need to involve their people and all that. And so it’s all about, you know, serving your people. And it’s not about thinking that all the brains go up the hierarchy, it’s just really turning that pyramid upside down and realizing that people really can make a difference. And, uh, so, uh, if people really want to be servant leaders and yet a lot of people are, what’s the problem.

Well, we find it’s a human ego and you can call that edging God out or everything good outside. And all we have found that there’s two ways that the ego gets in the way, uh, for people. One is pride and arrogance, which is having an overly high opinion of yourself, you know, and that’s promoting yourself, boasting talking all the time, showing off doing all the talking, demanding all the attention. And that’s what we kind of call false pride. You know, it’s, uh, it’s comes from a more than philosophy. Uh, and the other way that ego shows up in a lot of people wouldn’t have thought of this as an ego problem, they would talk false pride would be surely one, but fear or self doubt, where you have a low opinion of yourself, and it comes from a less than philosophy. And now you’re kind of protecting yourself because you’re hiding behind your position.

You don’t want people to know, you don’t know necessarily what you’re doing. You withholding information and you intimidate others. So they won’t go after you and you hard control. And you’re discouraging honest feedback. And I know that’s really sad. And what happens with either of those ego things, it always separates you from the greater good other people in yourself. It compares yourself with others, and you’re really never happy, you know, always distorts the truth and do a false sense of security and, and, uh, and self doubt. And, uh, so it’s, it’s really, uh, something. So we gotta really fight this ego thing. And, uh, servant leaders find how, how to let go of false pride and, uh, and self doubt. Uh, and what’s the anecdote for false pride. It’s humility. It’s really, some of you have read Jim Collins, his book from good to great.

And when the data came out, that he said that the greatest leaders are, have, have two things in common. One is kind of a compelling vision. He called, you know, a direction or a, and all that kind of thing. And then the second one was humility. And, uh, he couldn’t believe, you know, that the second key trait of a, uh, of a great leader was humility. And he said to us, researchers go back and take a look at that. And they said, no, I’m sorry, Jim. And a lot of people think humility is a weakness, but I think it was CS Lewis or one of those old timers who said, people with humility don’t think less of themselves. They just think about themselves less. And so that humility actually is a wonderful trait of a, of a great leader, because it really gets rid of this whole concept of false pride that you think you’re, you’re better than other people. And, and all, you know, it’s interesting can just

David Witt:
Going back to the example with Bernay Brown and Simon Sinek, and look at the re the, kind of the resurgence now with this idea of leaders, serving Simon cynics book, course leaders eat last Renee Brown with the whole idea that bravery is really being vulnerable as a leader. So you can really see this whole sense of understanding what your true places as a, uh, as a leader and, and having a sense of humility around.

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
And we had them spoke, speak at our last client conference, and it was really great. And I just love to support what they’re doing, because they’re the next generation. I mean, Dave, I just recently celebrated the 59th anniversary of my 21st birthday. Now I’m hoping for another 20 years, but you never know, but we gotta bring those youngsters along. And so, uh, it’s, uh, it’s really is, is fun. And, uh, so let’s take a look at the anecdote for self doubt is confidence resulting from a realization that you were valued. God didn’t make any junk. And I find that most of the people who have, uh, big egos at all, or people were scared, little kids inside because they’re not comfortable with who they are, and you gotta get comfortable with who you are. And to realize that you’re valued, you also realize you don’t know everything.

That’s why you hire people to come and work with you. And it really makes a difference. So if you get your ego out of the way, then you’re really able to, uh, be a servant leader, much, much more easily. And, uh, if you look here, this is the two aspects of servant leadership, uh, Dave, you. So the first one, the leadership part is when you get vision and direction. So several leaders take responsibility for developing a compelling vision and a strategy to achieve your organization submission. It doesn’t mean they don’t involve people, but it’s their responsibility. But you see when you turn that pyramid upside down, who’s responsible now all the people in the organization and especially the front line people and what is responsible, able to respond. And now what’s your job as a leader, you gotta be responsive because you’re there to help them.
Dr. Ken Blanchard:
So when you invert the pyramid, you move to the bottom as the cheerleader supporter and encourage her. And, uh, that’s, uh, that’s really where the action, uh, and, uh, it just makes such a such a difference. And so the leadership part is all about vision and direction. And then the servant part is about turning that period out side down. Now you work for your people and, and that’s what great leaders understand. And, uh, uh, so what do we got there? We’ve got everybody’s name. Okay. Uh, uh, it’s interesting. I wrote a book with Mark Miller who was the head of training and development and all for Chick-fil-A. And I I’ve done a lot of work with Chick-fil-A and that’s another one of those great companies. And I don’t think I mentioned them as a servant leadership company, but I wrote a book with Troy carers, Cathy, the founder called the generosity factor that it most generous factor.

And then I wrote two books with Mark Miller, and one of them was called great leaders grow. Uh, and we developed an acronym there, which is the great leaders. What do they do? They serve? And, uh, what is the S see the future, which is about vision and direction. And then the is, and they engage and develop their people. So seeing the future is about the traditional pyramid responsibility, the leadership part of servant leadership, and then engaging, developing people. You turn that pyramid upside down, and then they are, is really important is that you need to reinvent yourself continuously. You don’t want to get stuck. If things are changed and things are changing so fast out in the environment that we really need to constantly be learning. I wrote a book with Norman, Vincent Peale, the yo you know, positive thinking, uh, guru. And he said, if you stop learning, stop yourself, you ought to lie down and let them throw the dirt on you, cause you’re already dead.

Uh, and then the V is what the results that we hope you want to get is you want to value results and relationship. It’s not an either or it’s both. And, and a lot of times it’s top down managers think it’s results. It’s only important. And then sometimes the human relations type. Just think it’s just about your people. No, it’s both. Then you got to volley value, both of them. And then finally the E is to embody the values, particularly in the values of your, your organization. So that really is a, what really makes a great, a great servant leader. So a day that really kind of covers what I wanted to, uh, cover, you know, and to say that, no, if you want to be a great leader, you know, you’ve got to first is, you know, uh, have a compelling vision and then second treat your people, right? Third, treat your customers right. And forth, have the right kind of leadership, which is all about servant leadership. Well,

David Witt:
That was wonderful. And I loved how with that last slide, even looking at the, the book that you wrote with Mark Miller on great leaders grow, as we looked at the serve model, we could see a lot of the same concepts that you talked about earlier around the vision, you know, turning the pyramid upside down, engaging your people, you know, and then having a clear sense of what your values are. We’ve gone ahead and turned our video back on here’s us back in the studio again. And we’re going to go ahead and take questions from all of you with the time that we’ve got remaining. Go ahead and use the question panel there at the bottom of your screen. Just go ahead and open that, send in your question and I’ll go ahead and ask Ken your questions. We’ll get through as many of those as we can with the time that we’ve got remaining. Can the first question that I’ve been wanting to ask is I think a lot of the people that are on with us today are loving the concept of servant leadership and are probably in a lot of ways already thinking in this direction, but they’re considering how do they take this concept back to others in their organization? Folks that might not be as familiar with it. What’s your suggestion?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
My suggestion, Dave is you don’t go back and you say, boy, I went to this seminar and this is something you should do. And you got, you’re pointing that finger at them. I think what you need to do and share it up the hierarchy you say, you know, I, I said the seminar the other day, it was really interesting. I love to share with you what I got out of it. And then let’s talk about, is there any elements of this that might be useful for us in our organization? And you’re not going to get pushed back because you’re really letting them get involved. And you’re, you’re making I statements, not you statements. And I think that’s the way you implement things. Well, that’s great. Thank you.

David Witt:
Can, another question came in that it might be harder in today’s busy world that you talked about with this whole idea of, you know, starting with the pyramid right side up and then turning it over. Do you think that there’s enough time to do that?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Well, I think that people gotta recognize this. If your manager what’s your most important job, but your people and I just laugh when people say, God, I can’t do with those one Oh one every two weeks, I don’t have the time. So what are you doing? You’re probably in too many meetings. You know, what we need to do is get out of the meetings. I mean, meetings are important, but have one-on-ones and managed by wandering around. Uh, and, uh, so I was just, uh, reading and studying a book called, uh, leading with gratitude.
David Witt:
Oh, is that Adrian [inaudible]

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
And it’s a really a great book, but it’s all about that. You know, catching people, doing things right, that I’ve talked about him wandering around and getting outside your office, it stopped, you know, hiding in there. You’re you’re supposed to be working with your people and cheering them on.

David Witt:
Ken, another question came in, this was, we’re talking about the quadruple bottom line and people are asking, you know, when you’re trying to make sure that you’ve got a good return on shareholder value, is that mutually exclusive from taking a servant leadership approach?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
No, I think that you gotta be concerned about the shareholder value and that, or the investment of choice. But as I said, it’s the third focus is that what I really have found David is the great organizations realize the profit is the applause you get for creating a motivating environment for your people. So they take care of your customers. And then those customers become, I’ve said earlier, raving fans, and that takes care of the investor.

David Witt:
That’s great. Thank you, Ken, for those of you that have not typed your question, I think some folks might be typing it into the chat box. If you can go ahead and type your questions into that Q and a panel, that’s where we’re actually just kind of working down the list that’s in there right now. We, uh, Ross’s question about what’s an effective way to develop these servant leadership skills in those you work with. So that’s a great question. You’ve kind of shared with us the mindset of being a servant leader. Any thoughts on how do you get started when you go back to work, uh, with what’s the skill set to be in a servant leader?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Oh, well, it’s interesting. The two big concepts, of course we teach is SL two, which is our situational approach to effective leadership. And it begins with clear goals. If you don’t have clear goals, then you can’t determine what leadership style should I use. And so what you learn quickly is it’s different strokes for different folks, but it’s also different strokes for the same folks on different parts of their job. And so that, that, uh, what you got to do with your people is after you set goals, you need to analyze what their development level is. Are they enthusiastic beginner and they need a directive leadership, or are they kind of a, you know, disillusioned learner, they need to kind of coaching one. Or they came in with a cautious and they needed a supporting style, or they self directed Cheever in that goal. And they, you can use a delegating style and you just need to figure that out.

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
And the goal setting again is the responsibility of the hierarchy, but then once you’ve agreed on leadership style and all that, you turn the pyramid upside down and now you deliver the style you promised. And then we also, of course, you know, go back to the one minute manager. What’s the first secret woman at goal setting, which again is about vision and direction. And then once that’s set, you wander around and, you know, give people one minute, praisings, you know, as they’re doing well. And, and if it’s not going as well, but one minute redirect, which is not sort of punishing them, but you’re saying, gee, I’ve been looking at the numbers here, cause you’ve agreed upon the goals and objectives. And this one doesn’t seem to be moving the direction we want and what could I do to help you get there? That’s a, that’s a redirect, but a supportive redirect. It’s not sort of putting the finger at them.

David Witt:
That’s great. It makes a lot of sense. Ken, a question came in about, Oh, we’ve got, multi-generations working in the workplace today. As you think about the newer generations coming into the workplace is servant leadership applicable for them also.

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Yes. And one of the things Dave we found was the newer generations. You know why, and then they’re now they’re talking about Z. What happens after Z? Do we go to AA? I don’t know, but you know, the whole concept of top down leadership just doesn’t cut it with them. And so what we’re talking about in our work is side by side leadership. It’s not that these younger people want your job, but they wanted to really feel that they can make a contribution.

David Witt:
Another question came in, does servant leadership translate into different cultures?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Yes, it does. We were around the world with our stuff, whether it was with the Blanchet work or with lead like Jesus and all and people around the world realize that it is, and they might, you know, make some tweaks in terms of their cultures and all, but wherever you go, people are starting to realize that if you want to be a great leader, you’ve got to make sure that they have vision and direction. And then once that’s set, you gotta make sure you work for them. And in some of the old cultures, which is all top down and all are finding that, uh, they’re not getting the performances and the productivity and the, the thing that they want. You know,

David Witt:
One of the things that all of you are seeing here on the slide, that’s on the screen right now, the dots are representing all the different Blanchard offices around the world. And this Ken was mentioning this approach to leadership has been used very successfully in all of the different countries that you’ve seen indicated on the slide in front of you. A question came in from Simon. This one is, uh, in terms, uh, in times of self-organization and self directed and individuals, do we even need leaders in the future? What is your take on that, Ken?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Well, I think we need always leaders just because the emphasis of leadership is envisioned in direction, you know? And, uh, uh, you say, well, self leader will, they can figure that out themselves, but I think we need this kind of the teamwork, uh, was a thing. And so I don’t want to bust the whole concept of a hierarchy out, but just recognize that to be really effective. It gets turned upside down and all. And I think it’s a, it’s a, it’s a good to have that teammate and that person to dialogue with who has maybe a different responsibility than you got.

David Witt:
Another question came in when you were talking about the a, B and C players, maybe like with Gary Ridge at WD 40 question came in from Daniel. So if an employee is consistently a C performer, but rarely achieves a beer and a, are they still worth keeping or does that define a new performance curve? Can you talk a little bit about your thoughts on people at different levels, a, B and C and what you’ve seen the best companies do? Well, I think

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
If you find this a manager that is somebody working with you, uh, no matter how you work with them, there’s still end up with a C and most of their goal areas. And all, I think you, you, you give them at least one chance to kind of get back in the, in the game. But, um, finally, uh, Gary Ridge has a wonderful concept. You might have to share them with the competition, you know, and yeah, you don’t want to keep a C players, but you don’t want to say, we have to have so many C players, you know, this normal distribution curve, why can’t you I’ll help everybody win a person isn’t winning, no matter what you do, then you either try to find another job for them in the company that it’s a better fit or, uh, or share them with the competition

David Witt:
Question came in about, uh, coaching. And do you find, and what’s your experience with coaching people in addition to putting them through, you know, some sort of a learning program?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Well, we, we do a lot of coaching work and the neat thing about a coach on the way we define it, that they’re not trying to tell you what to do. You know, it’s not my good bud buddy, John Calipari, as a coach at Kentucky, I was watching last night. He does a lot of telling

David Witt:
That might be a different definition, right?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Well, I’d tell you he motivates his guys and all that, but the coaches we talk about, they’re trying to help you be the best as you can. Now, Calipari Perry is trying to do that too, but what they do, they spend more time drawing the answers out of you. The assumption is that did you really can, uh, come up with your own direction and come up with a of things and they want to help you realize that it’s all there.

David Witt:
That’s great. Thanks, Ken. I want to go ahead and highlight for everybody also on the screen, your CNA, uh, both the, uh, the URL for the Ken Blanchard companies and Ken blanchard.com. But more importantly, I’m seeing a couple of questions that seem to be a little bit more in depth, gonna require a fairly in depth answer. If, uh, if you are asking that type of question or if you’re the type of person like me, who, the question that you really wanted to ask and comes to you after the end of the session, we’ve got an email box there for your webinars@kenblanchard.com. And you can send a question there and we’ll go ahead and we’ll forward that onto Ken. So you can get a personal response on that. One of the questions that came in that might fall into that category can, there’s a couple of terms here that I am not familiar with, which is restorative justice and transformative justice practices. Uh, and specifically in the context of interpersonal conflict, um, I don’t know really the answer to that as far as how does servant leadership lean on those two concepts?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
This one we’re going to turn over to Dre as the Garmin okay. Has up our research. And he’s been really interested in looking at the difference between restorative and transformational, you know, and transformational is all about helping people continue to grow and restorative is, you know, how do we get them back on track or something, but that’s not an area that I’ve spent a lot

David Witt:
Timeline. Okay. So go ahead. And that’s a great question, a sample question to send us a webinar’s Ken blanchard.com. And we can redirect that to other people here in the organization and the, like you were saying, uh, you know, Dre is the person that I’ve seen talk about, uh, justice as in inside of our work around employee work passion. We did another question came in with folks that are interested in learning more about servant leadership. Of course, your book servant leadership in action is great leading at a higher level, a great resource. Are there other, uh, writers, other authors, other sources of information that you might point people to?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Well, uh, I already mentioned people. I think that Patrick Lencioni is really wonderful, uh, work and, and, uh, we’ve talked about Simon and Bernay Brown and, and all, and Marshall, Goldsmith’s a good buddy of mine. And, and, uh, he’s talking about coaching. He’s been chosen the number one executive coach in the world. Yeah. And, uh, so they’re all really good people that are constantly studying and working in this, this whole area. And there’s a whole bunch of others that are, are in there, you know, uh, Posner and, uh, Kusa supposing her, you know, their work.

David Witt:
And maybe even back to the, you mentioned, you know, back to Jim Collins, you’ll try to reference.

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Yeah. Jim has a lot of great research in this area. Yeah. Another question came in when this, both Joe and Courtney asked the same question asking about if you were to, uh, create a servant leadership type program in your organization. Could you talk a little bit about what would be some of the skills you would probably be building into the curriculum? Any, any thoughts? Well, we really have that in our master’s degree program and executive leadership at the university of San Diego. Cause what I think is it, uh, being a great leader is a transformational journey. And we start with self leadership. You know, we have three courses right there on how do you really get to know who you are? What is your mission? What is your values? My wife, Mars United teach a course on determining your leadership point of view, who are the people who influence your life from the most and what values did you get from them?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
And what does that mean about what are your expectations of people and what can they expect of a view? And once you have a sense of yourself and feel comfortable with who you are, then we moved to one-on-one leadership, which is how do you build a sense of trust with another person? And so we’ve really done a lot of work. Randy Conley is our trust guy and in our company. And, and, uh, but it’s really important because when people trust you, they’re willing to turn their, you know, let you turn your back on them. You know, if you don’t trust them, you closely supervised them and face them all the time. And, uh, and so then, and was that a community, and again, you need to determine what is the group development level in terms of what leadership style do you start with? A lot of people say, well, it’s a group list to have participated a thing.

No, if it’s a new group, you might want to start off with directive behavior because you gotta set what’s the vision and direction and values for this particular group. But over time it can be much more of a participative, uh, thing. And, uh, and then finally, we go to organizational leadership, which is how do you enter an organization, you know, and create a culture. And I think that’s just so important. And people like, you know, do the reading stuff. Alan Malali is well from a board for, to amazing a guy and, and, uh, th these kinds of people who have been out there, uh, and making a difference, Gary Ridge, uh, with, uh, Gary and I wrote a book called, uh, help people win at work. And the subtitle is a business philosophy called don’t Mark. My help. My paper helped me get an a, you know, and so you want to take a look at the kind of things that they do, and then the good folks at Starbucks, you know, I mean, yeah, they do a lot of work around developing their people and the founder has written some wonderful stuff.

David Witt:
Howard Schultz. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Another question came in this time, uh, if, uh, somebody somebody’s maybe part of an organization that’s struggling, maybe struggling financially, and there’s a real need and urgency to turn the ship around, can servant leadership approach help with a company that needs to turn things around with all their pieces?

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Yes, it’s really is true. Dave, you know, back in 2008, you know, when we had that economic downturn, we realized in February that we’ve got to probably be 20, 25% below our sales estimates for the year. And so people said, we ought to better lay people off. And we said, they weren’t going to do that. But we were having a celebration meeting. We had planned, but we use the first day we brought an outside consultant and he divided all of our 300 plus people into small groups. And one half of the groups, their job was to come up with a ways that, uh, we can cut expenses. And then the other groups was how we can increase revenues. Cause those are the two big areas. And then we listened to them. We got tremendous suggestions from even suggestions that maybe we ought to take some salary cuts and maybe stop, uh, you know, contributing to, you know, uh, over time hundred, one K and all that.

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
And, and, uh, I told him if we pull out of this whole thing, we’re all going to go to Hawaii. And, uh, and we did, they all pulled us together. We took 300 people versus spouses to Hawaii for a four day weekend. That was a pretty special thing. But, but we constantly think that you need to involve your people and, uh, people when they get in trouble and they say, who was there laying off and all, all the decisions are coming from the hierarchy rather than say to people let’s share with you, we’re in trouble. We need your help, including maybe taking some salary cuts and some other things. And how can we do that? So in that process, we didn’t lose people. We won people over

David Witt:
Well, Ken that hour went by quickly. And, uh, that was just amazing. Thank you for sharing with us. I feel like we’ve got kind of a best of, of your, uh, all the books that you’ve written. You kind of highlighted some of the key terms and kind of Wolverine, a red thread among all of them around the servant leadership. So thank you.

Dr. Ken Blanchard:
Yeah. And I don’t do that, Dave, because I’m bragging. My mother used to say to me, Ken, why don’t you write a book by yourself? Cause I’ve written 65, but two by myself, one on golf. So many people helped my golf game and in order to right with it. And the other one is on my spiritual journey. Uh, so I love to learn from other people. And, uh, I would just, uh, if I was going to give you one suggestion is be a learner, be a constant learner. That’s the way to grow. The Gary Ridge has a wonderful thing in WD 40. There are no in w before, there’s only learning opportunities. People it’s like the cover up mistakes, but they come and say we had this great learning opportunity. And then everybody said, Whoa, isn’t that interesting? What can we learn from it? Love that. Be a learner. Well, Elizabeth we’re at the end of our time, we’d like to go ahead and turn the session back over to you for a final thoughts and wrap up.

Elizabeth Parker:
All right. Thank you so much, David. And thank you both for being with us today. I think I speak for all of our attendees. When I say that we really appreciate your time and it’s been an impactful hour on, on servant leadership. So thanks so much. And in closing, I would just like to invite you all to join us for some upcoming training industry webinars, you can find out what’s next register for an event or watch past webinars now@trainingindustry.com. And as a reminder, all of our webinars are prequalified for a credit hour by Sherm ISPI, NCTM CPTs is a certified professional and training management program that assists you in developing core competencies that will empower you to manage the future training needs of your organization. You can participate in a number of practicums held within the U S or join a virtual event from anywhere in the world. Find out more@trainingindustry.com slash CPTs. And we have two upcoming conferences that I hope you’ll consider joining us for. The first is a virtual conference. All about the future of the workforce. Registration is free and open. Now you can sign up@trainingindustry.com slash Tice virtual, and I’d love to meet you all in person at our annual training industry conference and expo scheduled for June 16th through 18th here in Raleigh, North Carolina, you can learn more about our in-person conference@ticetwentytwenty.com.

Elizabeth Parker:
One last reminder that an evaluation survey will have popped open in your browser. We’d greatly welcome your feedback about the session today. Thanks again to our presenter, Ken Blanchard, thanks to our sponsor litmus and to all of you for your time and attention with training industry. I’m Elizabeth Parker, and I hope you all have a great day.

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