22 Apr 2020
1:00 pm ET 60 mins

Facilitator Skills Development is Ernst & Young (EY)’s most popular course. However, originally delivered as an in-person instructor-led (ILT) course, it lacked the scalability to reach a global audience without compromising quality.

Join us for this complimentary Training Industry webinar, sponsored by Intrepid, to hear how EY developed a three-week blended learning program featuring webcasts, fast feedback, peer-reviewed social features and lively videos to expand its reach — without compromising quality in the process.

This interactive webinar will provide easy-to-understand insights on:

  • Transitioning from an ILT format to a virtual one
  • How to expand your course’s reach while maintaining quality instruction
  • How to deliver just-in-time content without sacrificing quality

 

The transcript for this webinar follows:

Elizabeth Parker:

Hello, and welcome to today’s training industry webinar, teaching soft skills in a virtual environment, a case study sponsored by Intrepid I’m Elizabeth Parker, marketing and event manager at training industry. And I am very happy. You could join us for today’s event. Before we get started. I have just a few housekeeping items to review that will help you interact with our speaker and get the most out of today’s program throughout the event today, please feel free to chat your comments and your chat window and submit any questions you have for our presenters and your Q and a panel. And we will address them towards the ends of the program. We also encourage you to share the information you received today with your colleagues and network on social media. Please include the handle Intrepid LS and the hashtag T I webinars. So we’re able to engage with you and track your contribution to the conversation. When the program ends, you will see a short evaluation survey pop open in your browser. We would greatly welcome your feedback about the content speakers topics for future webinars and anything else you might like to share. And as always today’s webinar is being recorded and will be archived on training industry.com. And you’ll receive a followup email from us with a link to the on demand program that you can share with your team.

If this is your first webinar with us, a special welcome goes out to you. At training industry, we offer near a hundred webinars every year on subjects ranging from content development, managing technologies, emotional intelligence, soft skills, training, coaching performance management. We covered just about every topic relevant to leaders of training organizations around the globe. And if you’ve attended one of our programs in the past, thank you so much for joining us again and to kick us off. I’d love to start us out with our first poll question. Go ahead and let us know what your role is. And if you’re neither of those, you can type something in the chat. And we’ll take a look at that there.

And now it’s my pleasure to introduce you to your speakers, David Bruce off and Judy Albers. David serves as the director of talent management for the Americas at Ernst and young. His passion for learning is clear. Having earned a distinguished constructor award from the Y in 2015, his team’s leadership development and diversity efforts are often proud with E Y as best in class. David also is accredited by the society for human resource management as a senior professional in human resources. And he holds a bachelor’s degree in communications from California state university. Judy is a principal consultant with Intrepid and is on a mission to rid the world of boring learning technology. She has been a learning strategist with Intrepid by vital source for 13 years prior to her current position, she led learning technology for JP Morgan chase. She has an ms in instructional design from Purdue university,

Judy and David. The floor is now yours.

David Bruesehoff:
Thank you. Thank you, Elizabeth. And welcome everybody from around the world. We’re so excited to spend time with you, Judy, especially this is so exciting because we’ve had the chance to work together now for four years. So I’m super, super excited to share with our audience today. All the things that you’ve helped E Y discover, uh, through this fabulous journey. So I’ll turn it back over to UGB.

Judy Albers:
Thanks, David. It is so great to have you with us and thanks everybody for joining us. Um, we were originally going to do this session at the ATD international conference in may. And so we just bumped it up and turned it into a webinar and just fascinating that so many people are interested in what we’re going to chat about. Um, if you have the poll results, Elizabeth, it would be great to find out like who’s here from an internal learning and development provider. Who’s here from a training provider. Some of you can tell us in the chat, like, what else do you do? And this is interesting. I had thought that it might be kind of split half and half. Some of you are here because you sell training and Holy cow, suddenly you need to, you know, do something different. Um, and some of you are here well, because also maybe you need to suddenly do something different.
J
Um, or maybe you just want to see a really great example. And I feel like David, your course teach with charisma. Um, I’ve put, you know, dozens, dozens, and dozens of these, um, courses in soft skills or human skills as I like to call them now, uh, on our Intrepid platform. And I really consider yours a gold standard. It’s just, it’s so out funding. And so we’re going to tell the story about the teach with charisma course, but also make it really practical for you guys. We know that not everybody uses the same technology we use and B has the kind of budget that EOI has. Um, so let’s hop into what we’ll cover today. Um, we’re gonna start with why we hesitate to teach human skills online. And David is the poster child for a former skeptic, right? And then David will talk about what Eli accomplished in their teach with charisma course.

Um, and we’ll do a quick demo of the course. And then we thought we would get into, because I’ve been, I’ve been at this online collaborative learning thing now for a good four or five years, what I find across the board. Um, and especially with people who come to the table as owners of a body of knowledge or a course or curriculum that is human skills, is that there are shifts we need to make in our mindset. And then there are also new skill sets that maybe we didn’t need to have before. Um, and we need to either develop or build a network of people or a team of people who have these skill sets. So we’ll talk about those two things, and then we’re going to get really practical and tactical, um, at the very end. And we’re going to say, guess what? You can do it for less than, you know, if you don’t have the kind of world class resources at your disposal, um, that David has, there’s still a lot of things that you can do. Um, so that’s our plan for today. And so David, while, um, oops, there we go. While folks are popping into the chat, um, I, we want to actually make this webinar in which 419 people have joined us so far, uh, collaborative. And so, um, you can kind of like follow along in the chat while David tells the same story I’m interested in hearing from you guys, why has your organization hesitated to put human skills training online? And while you talk about that, David’s gonna tell his story of what, what were your hesitations, David?

David Bruesehoff:
Hey, thank you. You know, I oftentimes think the best story told is the one that’s personal up close and near and dear to the heart. And so just a brief overview of my Odyssey going from what I’ll call a somewhat of a disbeliever in this format, who being an evangelist, a champion at [inaudible], I’m here with all of you today. Um, so four years ago, exactly four years ago, my boss, our chief learning officer, his name is Tal global Tamar for the Americas. Uh, he came to me and said, you know, that class that you teach so much of around what I, what I like to colloquially call teaching our teachers, how to teach, uh, it was a live action multi-day course. I want you to virtualize that. I thought that was pure heresy. And just to prove my point, I went out to some of our bigger, um, and use of the, this concept.

And they too were shocked and just report absolutely recoil, but it’s been an Odyssey since that point in time to now four years later, where I’m so proud of what we’ve done. I know we’re going to go deeper on the story soon, but it really, you know, if any of you are setting, standing on the precipice of taking the deep dive, I took four years ago, I’m right there with you. I have respect for you because this is a hard thing to do. And it’s even harder when you have nearly a hundred thousand that are going to be potential end users of your course, as I do with E Y in the United States. So, um, that’s, that was kind of a bit of my, my start of my story here.

Judy Albers:
Thank you, David. It’s been interesting to browse the chat. Um, a couple of people said, Hey, we haven’t hesitated. We dove right in. Um, other people are saying, you know, we have soft skills online, but nobody takes it, which is very typical. Um, and, uh, and there’s a lot of, I think there’s a lot of reasons why that is. Um, and some of you are saying, you know, it’s my clients who are hesitant or sometimes, you know, it’s just a general fear of low quality of training. I think Ahmed, you just, you know, you summed it up perfectly. So let’s talk about let’s. Um, I believe that all of those things are, you know, are absolutely valid. So let’s talk David about what you guys accomplished with teach with charisma. And I think we’ll be able to demonstrate that you can actually, there’s a magic that happens in the classroom, which people are hesitant to give up, but there can be digital magic too.

David Bruesehoff:
Yes, yes.

Judy Albers:
Yeah. Let’s first just like lay the groundwork for what teach with charisma is like, how long

David Bruesehoff:
Does it work? Okay, great. So, um, it’s, it’s definitely a different approach. Uh, historically we would do. And I personally had responsibility for a number of years prior to the implementation of what I, we now have a shortened to TWC or teach with charisma. Um, historically we would run two day courses all over the U S in the Caribbean and Canada elsewhere. In some of our parts of the Americas, the class was actually taught by an outside vendor and that outside vendor would take up to four days. So it was a very elongated process. Now, part of it was designed to develop a sense of camaraderie amongst our facilitators. Um, just to put things into perspective for you. So we are a training machine. Um, we teach about 10,000 classes a year, a year folks, and we have roughly 4,000 people who teach them. So they’re subject matter experts.

They have deep subject matter expertise. So we’re doing our, taking the SMEs and the SMRs and we’re taking and turning them into these winsome, some wonderful people who stand on a platform, the Sage on the stage, if you will model. Um, so it was partly to kind of give them a sense of like, you’re a part of something special. And there was a hesitation around that aspect too, but going from that to where we are today, where it’s now across three weeks, um, there are three in person meetups. Um, we actually create a cadre of folks who work as part of a cohort for said time. And yes, folks, if you’ve ever taken anything through Coursera and the other freebies online, the danger of course always is dropout. And we have our dropouts too. So it happens. Um, but in general, what’s happening is we have begun over the past several years to really embrace this.

And now we’re to the point where people actually stick with it and they follow it all the way through. When you go from a two day session to three weeks across multiple touchpoints, you do have drop-off, it’s going to happen. But, um, I dare say what we’ve crafted this for, that has now created this environment where people are actually energized and invigorated, and they want to follow through with that, which we have created of course, with Intrepid health. So these teach points and touch points actually have practice. They have peer to peer, um, skill development, uh, there’s pers super personalized coaching throughout, and you can kind of get the lay of the land here. What’s happening between weeks one, week two and week three. Um, none of this is necessarily prerecorded. We do have a digital assets, which I know Judy will tell you more about, we’ve got about 50 digital assets, but they tend to be snippets. [inaudible]

learning a lot of what happens for folks is they have to go out and they’ve got a prerecord, something for themselves, and then put it out there and have their peer group judge it. And I’ll tell you that really, really works for soft skill development terrifically. So people can discern between what’s hot and what’s not. And so they can be ruthless way more so than I can and respects, but this just kind of gives you a real high level overview of what’s happening from week one, week, two, week three, and all the different touch points that are occurring along the way, coupled that with things like office hours. And then we have a huge, now we’ve developed kind of an aftercare class so that you, you go through this and we never used to have this before where people know have like a SharePoint hub equipped with all the resources. They can come back and visit the, the digital assets on TWCs hub. Um, they can get some

Judy Albers:
More coaching after the fact. Um, the other thing that’s super powerful with this is folks are taking the training in much closer proximity than when they used to take it. So formally when they’re going to actually, where they’re going to use it. So the model is, you know, I take it, I finish it. And then I’m in the classroom, either the virtual classroom or the live classroom either way. And I’ll tell you that makes a huge difference from an end user perspective. So our students are telling us teacher, these are the teachers that are coming through the facilitators come through. They’re actually better at and more engaged because the reinforcement is there. So we’re smartly using those learning principles to a much greater extent than we ever did through the thoughtful design that it gave us when we set this up a number of years ago. Oh, that’s so cool. David, I could talk to you all day about this and we can know you’re we’re right on time. We can come back to this too, because we wanted to put this slide in because everybody always asks, wait, how does that work? You know how specifically is, but, um, we thought rather than talk about it, we’ll show you. So let me do a screen share here, and I’m going to, um, show you, uh, let’s see. So Elizabeth, if you could stop sharing, I’ll start sharing and here we go.

All right. Can you all see my screen? Yes. Alright, great. So this is, um, this is the teach with charisma course. You can see that we like to put our in a hall gold metal right there on the home page. Well done, David. And so David talked about it being a three week experience with live sessions. So you’re spending about three hours a week, um, doing the things that are really the flipped classroom, anything that used to be lecture or presentation, or, you know, turn to your neighbor and talk about this or that. Um, that is all done online now. And so when you’re in, I opened it up to say week three, um, when I’m in week two, uh, only the only thing people have to focus on is just the content of this week. Like they can go back to week one, but they can’t go forward to week three.

And I think an important principle is that if you’re gonna make something collaborative, you have to have people in the same place at basically at the same time. Um, so one of the reasons why collaborative learning often fails because people feel like they went into some discussion forum and it’s like screaming into the void. Um, you know, you need to, you need to keep the group doing the same thing. They also really appreciate just knowing what’s expected of them. So from the perspective of brain science and the ages model, which we are very big fans of, um, people need the spacing, cramming doesn’t work. And I think David, that’s a big reason why people are better, um, than they were when they went in the classroom. Because not only is it closer to their moment of need, but it’s also that we spaced the learning out that allows people time for reflection and time for more time to practice and more time to get feedback and reflect on it.

So it really does support, you know, the way people learn skills over time. Many is weak to here as an example. And in week two, we’re talking about how do I tell a good story? How do I connect to my class, to the content? How do I bring everybody into the class? And then they have an assignment which they do before the live session. And then in the live session, that’s when David or Caitlin or one of the other instructors works with them and actually gives coaching and feedback. So the classroom is flipped and what the instructor is doing is coaching and interacting with people and giving much more in depth feedback. Um, then you can, when, you know, when a lot of your class time has to be spent delivering content, so I’m going to open up all of these sections here and we’ll give you some good examples.

We’ve got a lot of great videos, um, in here. Um, so Caitlin does the four CS of storytelling. Um, and then we give examples and I think one of the, one of the beautiful things, David, that we were able to do online, and, you know, I like that your bio includes the, the efforts that you’ve been recognized for in diversity and inclusion. Um, when we took this online, we were able to bring in a more diverse set of instructors than anyone would ever get if they attended class with one instructor or two instructors. So you can hear Katelyn talk about the four CS of storytelling, and then you can actually get four people from E Y telling stories.

Well, okay, this is Scott, the white guy, but

You get the, but in Benny and many other blazes, we’ve thought like a really like a very nice set of, um, you know, diverse representation of people from all over the world. People from all ages, genders, nationalities, races. Um, and I think that that is really important that you have to model what’s important to you.

David Bruesehoff:
In fact, one of the names you see on here, Hassan Rafiq, he is Facebook’s global diversity and inclusion leader. He used to work for you. Why am I here in 2028, just ascend at the height. So super proud of the things that he’s done for EOI and now is going to be doing for Facebook so that those diverse voices and diverse faces, um, these are things that we formerly, we just could not work a straight, um, we had real trouble doing so, and through our digital assets. Plus we now have a standing cadre. It’s not even a cadre. It’s more like a, like a standing classroom of, um, skilled virtual facilitators. There’s about, um, 25 that routinely help us serve in what you’re seeing, uh, Caitlin do here serve as a coach. And so they’re a part of the live sessions and they come from all kinds of backgrounds.

They’re super enthused about the content because they themselves have been through it and that they can take and turn and impart their experiences, um, with their audiences. Again, these are the kinds of things you have. You’re very hard pressed to do when formerly, as I made mentioned earlier at 60 different classrooms, going from, you know, The Bahamas to Toronto, to San Jose, uh, to cell Paulo, I had like classrooms going on all over the place and the consistency just was not there. So you’re really able to drive the consistency. Um, in addition to making sure that we’re paying attention to diversity and inclusion in our classroom,

Judy Albers:
I think even in terms of style, I remember doing a similar, um, train the trainer course for one of the world’s leading training companies. And, um, and I had to sit through their certification the first time. And the first day was with Mark and he was an amazing master trainer, but the second day Solomon showed up and she taught the same thing, but with a completely different style. And I realized that some people, you know, I resonated with aspects of Mark’s style and aspects of Solomon’s style, that it allowed me to see how much of myself I could bring to it. And with only one instructor, I don’t think I would have realized that

David Bruesehoff:
Plus with 4,000 people teaching or classrooms, not everybody identifies with some old white guy like me, you know, so we want to make sure we’ve got diverse spaces, diverse perspectives, mindsets, everything, and we’re bringing the full power of the firm to every classroom. And that’s what this, this program TWC has been able to unleash.

Judy Albers:
Absolutely. I think the other thing that we’re able to do is we’re to have people, um, see great examples, but then we try to not have them passive for more than five minutes before we have them do something active. So you saw Caitlin saying, um, you know, here’s how I use flip charts. And then, um, we thought, well, what can we do differently online that we can’t do in the classroom? And, um, one of the best things we can do is ask people to immediately see if they get it. Um, so we have them actually making a series of judgment calls. So it’s a pretty simple quiz, but, um, we had Caitlin drop out in her when she usually teaches it in class. She has this flip chart and it’s like, here’s the bad flip chart and can you find what’s wrong? And if you’re in the classroom and Kate and Caitlin shows the bad flip chart, um, some people might be on their phones.

Some people might guess the right answer, not everybody is engaging, right? Like as an instructor, you feel like you got one or two people engaging and you’re moving on, but online, everyone is accountable. Every single person has to make this series of judgment calls to review this flip chart and go, Oh, is item one. Is that title good? Yeah, I think it is, um, is item two, God, you can do better. I can’t even read the yellow, um, you know, item three. Yeah. I liked that you added the little picture and it doesn’t have to be, you don’t have to be an artist item four, I’m going to say some of that’s too small to read. Like you can do better and sure enough, then I get the feedback. Um, and I guessed it right. Cause I did pay attention to Kaitlin. Um, but I think some of these things also, they, there’s a level of accountability that as an individual, you have, um, that I don’t think you have when you’re in the classroom, like you can coach,

David Bruesehoff:
You can indeed. The other thing too, we’ve learned is through the experience of this. And this is really, this course has been Seminole to us. Um, it’s not the first learning hub that you all build for any why it actually was the third one, but one of the things that we’ve really perfected with this particular class and it now in the throws of COVID-19 where every class is being lifted and shifted. Um, one of the things that we’ve learned is how to interact with our virtual audiences. So previously, previously, you know, the implementation of this course, we really didn’t have a modus operandi for doing so. Honestly, we have a phrase around here called E Y nice. My parents are from the upper Midwest, they’re from Minnesota, so there’s Minnesota. Nice. So it’s kind of like that. So we don’t really end up in a classroom.

Oftentimes we, we use all kinds of subtlety to help manage the class in a virtual setting. Like this one, we don’t have that luxury. And it’s given our facilitators who have gone through this class now with COVID-19 going on, giving them the confidence and the boldness to take the reins and really work more, much more effectively on virtual platforms. And I dare say there’s a trickle over effect too, of being effective in virtual meetings of all sorts with our other peers. So it’s, the skills are not just simply containing to teaching classes. It actually spills over into a much broader cross section of what skill sets are needed and how to call those up. Especially in a, in a difficult time, like we’re all faced with right now.

Judy Albers:
Yeah. Right. And this is a perfect example. Like we’ve got, you know, dealing with disrespect, you might have it in the classroom, but you might also have it in life. And I was just amazed to find out that there are many advantages. Let me put her on you. And then eventually I was amazed to find out that people sign up for your class who are not facilitators. They’re just taking it to become a better human.

David Bruesehoff:
Yes, they are human skills. Yes. We need more of ’em. And you know, I think, um, especially our organization skews pretty young. So the median age, Saudi Y is like 28 years old, a lot of our 28 year olds. They’re managing huge teams now. And we have all kinds of different classes for them to improve their leadership skills. And so that’s not, not a challenge, but this course actually gives them the practice, the practical aspects of how to manage a group of people that aren’t always paying attention and care about what you have to say. So I think that’s kind of a cool thing. Um, that it’s one of those unintended things that we never, I don’t think we could have ever anticipated. We were just building this thing for the sake of, um, virtualizing a facilitator course, but it turned out to be so much more. And especially now in this very difficult time, we now have the strength to say, we know how to do this. We got this because this course really actually showed us the way. So I’m super proud of our efforts here, as you can tell.

Judy Albers:
I, yeah, I am too. I mean, I love these office style scenarios. Yeah. And then, but to, you know, it used to be that we would show videos. You know, a lot of people have show videos in class, but to say, watch this video, every single person has to a comment, you know, on, in this case, like what was one of David’s points that resonated with you? Or what do you think Jazelle should have done? A lot of times I’ll see people doing their soft skills training online by saying here’s a typical scenario. What would you say? And to be able to look through, you know, a hundred other peoples, what would I say next? What words would I choose? And then to be able to watch Jyzelle saying, you know, handling the exact same situation better. There’s just a lot of really great modeling, the ability to watch other people get coached, watch other people get better.
Judy Albers:
Um, so thank you, David, for that, um, you know, for everything that, all of your color commentary about this course, and I’m sure people are super interested in hearing more about it and some of like the logistics of how it works. Um, but I think that I’m going to pause the demo now and I will stop sharing or Elizabeth, if you want to, or you can just seize control back for me. Thank you, Elizabeth. Um, and let’s, let’s move on to, um, to something that applies to everybody. So I think your, your example is fantastic. And by the way, I don’t know why my video camera keeps turning off, but I’ll keep turning it back on. Um, so the mindset shifts that we made, um, were, were many. Uh, and so I thought what we would do, so let’s see Elizabeth, I can control your screen again.

I thought what we would do is to talk about some of the big shifts and we’ve alluded to some of them before. The biggest one that I find, um, in working with clients or skeptics is that they come to it. I come to this experience thinking, Oh, it’s going to be a pale shadow of the magic of the classroom. And, and they have to really stop and say, but wait a minute, the classroom has its own constraints too. Um, you know, we like, we, we’ve already talked about how you’re not actually that accountable when you take something face to face, um, you can’t do the kind of single concept learning where you have the time to let people reflect and practice and, you know, or just even see what’s wrong with this flip chart before you move on to the next single concept. So you can have higher quality learning if you do it. Right. Um, we talked about showcasing our best facilitator. Like there’s a lot of constraints about the classroom experience and, and because people are so tied to the magic of the classroom experience. And I think, especially now with what’s going on, um, with the shutdown, is that a lot of people think I can just lift and shift what happened in the classroom to online. Um, and, and David, what we made is really, really different than what happens in the classroom. Isn’t it?

David Bruesehoff:
Yes. And, and just to kind of build a, um, it’s a little extra, something extra when I lived in the, in, in Texas, uh, we were heavily influenced by, um, Cajun culture. And there’s a Cajun phrase land. Yeah, I know. I’m not saying it right, but it means a little something extra. So this is my little something extra that happens. Um, magic wise at consider. And many of you work with all the big four consulting firms. So our people are effectively on the road all the time. And the training experience is the one opportunity. They have to see their friends to make friends, to connect with people. Live action. Cause so much of our interaction is virtual. Now this virtual interaction thing has turned out to be an absolute boom during the shutdown. But I’ll say from a training perspective and a learning perspective, it was one of our biggest hurdles because especially for our leadership, our partners in particular, they were raised on going to a two, a three, a four or five day class and, you know, creating those relationships.

In fact, fun fact, a number of our folks get married eventually, or have relationships, extended relationships with folks they meet at these training classes. So I know that fun fact. So the reality is training in a live sense, really matters. It’s part of our culture. In fact, one of our predecessor organizations, um, Arthur Young and company, over a hundred years ago, they were a pioneer that they were the first of, of the accounting firms that would actually take an host in auditor learning week. So this is part of our DNA. This is who we are. This is how we show up and to take, that’s why I said at the outset, and I did my little kind of my own, uh, run. What do people think about this? There was huge skepticism about it. So it’s a, it’s a big deal. I, I know that today we’re in an amazing place. We are way ahead of where we would have been. Had we not made this particular change up four years ago, but back when we did it, when it was so ahead of the curve and our competitors actually built learning centers, and here we are making investments in virtual platforms, it seemed insane. So culturally, it was a big, huge deal. So if any of you client companies out there potential client companies to Intrepid are faced this, I feel your pain. I know exactly what you’re going through.

Judy Albers:
Um, thank you, David. That, yeah, I, and I think that if we think differently about, you know, if you try to put the classroom experience online, it’s going to be freaking boring. Um, you know, that that’s not what we want to do. And so, so many of our clients come to us and they think it’s all about the content. Here’s my content that I teach in the classroom. Let’s recreate the classroom experience online, and that’s just a recipe for disaster. Um, what you really need to do is think about it. Like you’re making a website and you have to be competitive in the digital space. You have to be competitive with other consumer websites that people are interacting with and, you know, and on those, there’s no such thing as let’s listen to a person lecture for 45 minutes. Um, so what you do is you start with what the learners need to be able to do.

And we said, they need to be able to teach. They need to be able to handle challenges. They need to be able to, um, use their, you know, bring their content to life. And then we said, how can we have them do that online? Well, they can record videos of themselves doing this and we’ll give them feedback. They can answer those quizzes about how to use flip chart, et cetera. Um, so we worked backward and all of the content which previously existed and in class is presented totally differently now. Um, so the flow worked fine in the classroom, but that flow has to be fundamentally different when you’re putting something online. And if you take that focus that people take in, um, creating a website, you’re going to be a lot better off. Oh, and the other big thing, David, you guys do such a fabulous job moderating this experience, but you would not believe how many people take the, they have the mindset of traditional online learning that I’m going to set it and forget it. Oh, I built this thing online. I, there, I’m going to go out there. And you know, for those of you who say, yeah, nobody takes the soft skills that we have online a lot of times because their set it and forget it kinds of courses. Um, can you talk a little bit about what Caitlin does as a moderator?

David Bruesehoff:
Yeah. So her, her focus is really keeping the class accountable and on track. Um, you, you saw just a minute ago, we have leader boards, we’ve got badges, we’ve got all those kinds of motivational tools that I have to give you credit 2d for introducing us to do. In fact, uh, in fact, Judy, you were the one who, who taught me that on every website, there’s a hamburger menu in the upper left hand corner. I never knew that three lines. So that’s the hamburger, but, um, you truly are kind of taking and blowing up that experience. So Caitlyn is then tasked with creating the right environment. And so she’s doing follow up and it’s not just when we’ve got that cadre of 25 people who do the followup. And even though the course is only 90 minutes every day for three weeks in a row, there is significant followup.

And there is that, you know, following through on, you know, Elizabeth you’ve sent in yours, Katie, you sent in yours, Judy, where’s your video, you know, so there’s, there’s, you gotta keep on top of that too. So this is not just out of the cyberspace and voila, it happens. There’s active bowls that each of your facilitators will continue to play. And I dare say, that’s the reason why you still have that feeling of connectedness. So that ties back to your earlier point. Judy, you can still create the connection, even though the physical classroom is not being leveraged in this particular sentence.

Judy Albers:
A lot of training companies who actually are a little bit afraid to go online because they have facilitators who are like contractors and very important partners with them. And they’re like, these facilitators feel like they’re going to be out of a job. Like I’m going to move everything online and we won’t need the facilitators anymore. Oh, contrare to say it the way you would, David, um, really you do need facilitators. You just need them to work differently.

David Bruesehoff:
Yeah, they they’re. Um, there are so many instances where, and this is something that our facilitator pool has had to raise its game on. Um, because people associate this with the virtual offering, there’s all the feedback going on behind the scenes. A lot of times the due dates are a little fluid. And so there’s a fair bit of follow up that facilitators do are doing, especially with uploaded submitted video snippets, uh, if it’s the facilitator’s role and responsibility to, to look at those and feed back, banging on the computer late at night, the night before to say, where’s your video, you know, because that’s part of the challenge. So, uh, you’re right. Our contraire, there is a heavy need for facilitators and as virtue by rule, you know what I have to share 25 people, we can’t just do this with one person. We have multiples of people helping us with this. And this is just one of virtual courses and offerings that we have.

Judy Albers:
Yeah. Yeah. And that’s not to say everybody needs 25 facilitators, but the point is that your user scenario determines how much facilitation, um, is necessary. And so don’t discount it. I’ve been also sort of surreptitiously scanning the chat. And I’m looking at some of the mindset shifts that you guys are talking about. Um, Oh, thanks. And Sophie, I said, Oh, contrare the right way. But David, you did not say well, law the right way, just for the record. Um, uh, so, but anyway, Elizabeth and Elizabeth said, um, you know, the mindset here is training as something to check off the box training is not a body of knowledge that we’re all contributing to. It’s not like learning what, that we’re all learning together and growing this. So it is really kind of fascinating. And I promise you guys that we will, um, curate the themes from your chat, cause it’s a lot to follow along with, but we’ll curate these themes and, um, and send them out.

We’re going to send you a package, um, afterward of, uh, some of the resources. Uh, so I think it’s good to talk about to get into what is the modern learning skillset. Um, I think that David and Caitlin, you have found that your you’re developing more skills in different areas than you had before. Um, so you either have to learn enough about these areas to know what good is. If you’re going to take your human skills digital, um, or you need to grow your network, you need to know whose good at visual design. You need to know who’s good at video production and you need to know enough to be able to say yes, that is, that is good enough. That is going to pass semester with our, you know, millennial audience with our gen Z audience with the digital natives. If you’re not PR, if you’re Minnesota,

David Bruesehoff:
I, I, you know, here’s the thing with that. Um, we, we have so many skill sets study. Y I mean, we’re like we are a virtual nation with all kinds of cool, uh, skill sets, but when it comes to this, you really do need expertise. And, uh, I do have to give a shout out to you all. And I know it sounds like I’m showing for Intrepid, but you guys really brought, um, significant resources to bear. We also did. Uh, and some of the video snippets that you profiled back when you were doing the live demo, came from people outside your sphere of influence. They were folks we had worked with and used, but the point of this slide is this is not a static situation. It is super fluid. So we’re actually on V2 version two, which we launched a little over a year ago now.

And, um, what we discovered is that version one, well, great, and version two, very similar to it. Um, we really needed to up our game for the digital natives. So earlier you made mention we’ve got a very young workforce and as a result, um, their expectations, their understanding, because they were raised on YouTube and all kinds of, you know, user submitted content, we had to make ours look a lot more interesting. So we did take that the office mockumentary style look and feel we did bring in more diverse faces and voices. Um, we did add kind of a grittier element that was reflective in fact to the, um, you took us out on a cool, uh, shoot in Brooklyn. So we, we got some street cred looking, um, materials. So this isn’t a one and done, you are going to have to look back at it, refresh it. Um, we’re now in talks again yeah. To, to improve the current state and to continuously raise our game. So it’s not just sending things out into cyberspace and hoping for the best and washing your hands. Oh no, no. You got to keep at it.

Judy Albers:
Um, so I think that what I have found in my role as a consultant, helping people learn to use our platform is that if my client can’t bring this sweat equity to the table, if you don’t have these skills yourself, it’s my job to be that gap filler. And everybody has different gaps, right. But I need to know who can do visual design for you, who can help you with marketing. Um, but I, it’s really interesting. I find that people with a marketing and a journalism background pick up on designing for our platform really, really well, because they already know how to get to the heart of the matter and they already know how to capture people’s attention. Um, so I would like to also gather from you guys, like what other skill sets did we not mentioned, um, that you think are needed for, um, collaborative, online, soft skills training to succeed?

Um, we’ll let you put those. And as I said, we’ll curate those and send them out. The other thing we’re going to send out and I’ll show this very quickly before we open it up for questions. Um, and so by the way, if you haven’t asked any questions in the Q and a, I do see there’s about seven waiting there. So Elizabeth monitoring those for us, but feel free to do that. We’ll answer as many as we can, um, over the years, um, as I’ve done this over and over with clients, what I have found is that I can templatize some of these things. I can make guides, so not everybody has David’s video budget, for example. Um, uh, so I made a do it yourself, video kit for less than a hundred dollars. What’s all the equipment that you need. And the tips to just send it to your subject matter, who is stuck at home to make sure their lighting is right, that their sound is going to be optimized.
J
And it’s really simple. It’s like, put your phone on a tripod with a ring light on it. Um, get a level of, or mic to capture your sound there. Um, you know, less than a hundred bucks, do it yourself, equipment, um, the guidelines, they’re all there. Uh, other things that we will offer to you guys. Uh, we’re actually, currently we just started on Monday, coincidentally, the second run of our design for collaborative learning course. Um, and, uh, I would imagine that Tom could manage to put a link to that in the chat, um, to sign up, but we’ll, we’ll send that out with the followup materials. We’ve also got a bunch of case studies including yours, but a lot of other like leadership, sales, coaching, all kinds of different, um, case studies for other sorts of usage scenarios. Um, and there’s, I learn a lot from reading those case studies.

Um, Katie, our marketing manager who’s here, does it really amazing job pulling those stories out? Um, I also think to your point, David, and to a lot of what I see in the chat, like putting something virtual, like virtual facilitation is a skillset in itself. Um, even my daughter took, um, a virtual design thinking course from Stanford and she loved it. And when they offered every other course, um, online because of the shutdown, like stuff that you could only previously take on campus, she signed up for another one and she was like, this guy has no idea how to teach virtually I’m dropping the class. Like he just doesn’t have that skillset. Tassie laborious, Tom stone wrote one of my favorite books. I’m on virtual facilitation. So I’m going to send that out to you guys. The DIY kit, usability testing is something web designers know, but it’s getting your voice of the learner early and often you need to iterate, like David said, we’d never consider ourselves done with this course. We’re always making it better or always incorporating the voice of the learner. So I’ve got some really nice templates for that stuff as well, wanted to make sure that we gave you something of immediate value. Um, you know, you certainly don’t have to use our platform or have David’s budget to do a good job, um, with your virtual collaborative training. Um, we’re also going to ask you to share any favorite resources that you have. We’ll compile those, um, as well. And with that, Elizabeth, let’s open it up to questions.

All right. Awesome, great session. Good. And Judy, and thanks for sharing. Fill many wonderful resources with us. Um, we will get started with questions. We have several already lined up and everyone, if you have other questions, go ahead and start asking those now in your Q and a,

Elizabeth Parker:
Um, in your Q and a panel. So it seems like the burning question that everyone wants to know is how long did this take David to transition from your in person course to that three week? Um, virtual course.

David Bruesehoff:
Yeah. So, um, all the steps that should be made mention of, um, Judy, I can’t recall how many meetings we had on just the color scheme, the color palette. We, we did so many kind of extra things because we knew we were stepping out and, and doing something very differently. So there was a lot of testing. We started literally around, um, labor day. It was shortly before or after labor day 2016. Um, we had our first iteration before Thanksgiving, 2016, we’d launched in January, 2017 full full-stop. So, um, I regard that going from, you know, like a live action course, you know, the development of the course and, and the virtualization of the course is a huge endeavor, but I dare say the bigger bit is getting people to adopt and adapt to it. So the first year, um, we offered both live action, our old school multi-day class plus teach with charisma.

And that’s the part that will most likely take you longer is making the cultural shift. Now I think if there could be a silver lining to this horrible situation, we’re in the midst of COVID-19 of the silver lining is adaptation to virtual platforms is much better right now because everybody’s doing that. Um, but that isn’t to say that you still won’t have holdouts that you won’t have people denigrating your efforts and telling you, Oh, it’s so much better. When we met in person, you got to get ready for some slings and some arrows that are going to be coming your way, because not everybody’s on board, but I will say now here we are nearly four years into it. And, uh, the, the acceptance and the rattling around in fact, when COVID first broke and he was an early embracer of shutting our offices down, we did. So back on Saint Patty’s day, 20, 20, um, immediately we were tasked with coming up with a 45 minute live action course that followed many of the teach with charisma principles around how to show up on camera. And this was shown in 10 days to 3000 people, hundred percent virtual.

How did she go up on camera?

David Bruesehoff:
Definitely have had a breakthrough.

I know. And I think that that’s, it’s so much of it varies. Um, it’s about how do you want

Judy Albers:
To be, how agile do you need to be? I have clients who are like, got to get something out there in two weeks. So we do it. Um, um, I’ve got other clients who were like, it’s going to take me a year because it has everything has to be perfect and we’re going to film 20 subject matter experts. And so it all is just so much of it is more about your design decisions, then how long does it

David Bruesehoff:
Tactically and Judy, to that point, I thought you guys, your team was really helpful in terms of, you know, taking, we had some stuff already created. So it wasn’t like we’re starting a, like nothing. We had some staff. So the act of curation of taking existing resources and just sort of plug in in a little differently.

Judy Albers:
Yeah. Like that flip chart thing. How can we do that one? Yeah,

David Bruesehoff:
Exactly.

Elizabeth Parker:
Right. So our next question, um, we had a couple questions about facilitators, so, um, I’m kind of combining two. So Richard wanted to now, how do you define a skilled virtual facilitator? And a question is in Arianna. What do you think about leveraging a manager as facilitator? If you don’t have the resources?

David Bruesehoff:
Well, let me just say, there’s a reason why, um, broadcasters only show up on camera for 30 to 60 minutes, this quite honestly projecting oneself and being, you know, this authentic and interesting person to watch. We hope we hope that’s what we crafted. Right? Judy, we hope we hope passing fingers. Yeah. It takes a fair bit of discernment. A lot of people just aren’t good with this yet. Now I think the Covance situation has accelerated everyone up the curve. It’s not impossible to learn. And every skill I’ve been able to, you know, lay claim to has been through practice. So getting people up to speed a lot of times, it’s like, we give you the basics of what you need, but then you’ve got to practice, practice, practice. It’s like anything else. And then to your question about managers, you know, um, if, if they have a camera presence, but honestly we have partners that don’t have, you know, camera presence, you got gotta be super discerning about who you put on camera is the point everybody’s cut out for that.

Judy Albers:
I agree. One of I helped a client take a presence course and put it online. And as part of it, we went through her virtual presence training, and there are so many specific skills that just make your camera presence that much better. Um, so yeah, that was one of the most valuable things I did talk about. Not knowing that there’s a whole set of skills to just turn on your webcam and using it properly.

David Bruesehoff:
And Kaitlin whom you mentioned many times over, she was actually a broadcast TV, um, major in college, just case. So the very skill sets, don’t just limit yourself to training populations, to Judaism earlier slide, you know, you’re going to have to procure some assistance. So if you don’t have this kind of help inside your company, um, find somebody get out there and have somebody help you you through, because it’s a big deal to go from, you know, the flat one dimension presence that we all have the first time we encounter being on camera to where people actually want to sit and watch you.

Elizabeth Parker:
here’s one from Stephanie and she wanted to know, um, it looks like she’s trying to take a short, soft skills course. That’s about two hours, um, online and she won’t be using able to use a webcam. So what skills as a facilitator would you suggest that she needs to use to keep participants engaged with her

David Bruesehoff:
Voice modulation is key and you know, you can actually, um, I know we’re kind of sharing with you a solution that’s that seems very intricate and lots of steps to be followed, but I dare say YouTube, you know, if in doubt, go to YouTube, we all do it, Google stuff. There’s a lot of stuff out right now, especially right here at now in this, in this particular time where people are saying, Hey, I want to share with you. I want to help you. So voice modulation and pacing helps with your facilitating skills. If in fact you cannot use cameras. Um, but I’m going to just say really, really strive to use a camera somehow some way, um, difference maker,

Judy Albers:
It’s worth it. And Cassie’s book that I’m going to send to you guys called interact and engage is just full of tons of exercises that you can do virtually whether your camera’s on or off. Alright, awesome. And one more quick question. Before we part ways today for now, this one comes from Richard and he wanted to know what the optimal length is for a virtual instructor, led training session. Virtual instructor led like David, you won’t go 90 minutes. Right.

David Bruesehoff:
We have a few occasions where we get to two hours, but few and far between.

Judy Albers:
Yeah. And I think that’s pushing it, you know, but I think it’s interesting because yours is all coaching. Like if it was 90 minutes of somebody presenting, like don’t do that.

David Bruesehoff:
No, don’t do that. Please spare the audience, spare yourself. Yeah.

Judgy Albers:
Yeah. So it kind of depends. I think you can go that long if people are interacting with each other, um, you know, just like people will be listening. People are willing to listen to a podcast for a really long time. Um, but when you have to watch something like their attention for video is a lot less, so you kind of have to think about, well, what is it? How interesting are you being?

David Bruesehoff:
Yup, exactly. Well, I’ll end with one quote that I think speaks to our situation at E Y. And that is that, um, faith or faith, um, uh, fate favors the bold. And so we have, you know, I’m sorry, fortune favors the bold, um, we have good fortune here, but it’s because we had people who were ahead of the curve, folks like Judy and the Intrepid team leading the way, uh, showing us that what is possible. And today we are very fortunate to have had the experiences that we have. We are set and ready to face the future, no matter what comes our way. And I’m really, really thankful to you, Judy, and to your team for your help and your help that you gave to Eli then four years ago, all the way up to today. So appreciate you.

Judy Albers:
Thanks, David. No better way to end the mat.

David Bruesehoff:
All right. You guys take care. Thank you so much for joining us.

Elizabeth Parker:
All right. Thank you, David. And thank you, Judy. And in closing, I would just like to invite everyone to join us for some upcoming training industry webinars. You can find out what’s next register for an event or watch past webinars now@trainingindustry.com. And as a reminder, our webinars are pre qualified for credit hour by SHRM, ISPI. NCPTT M C CBTM is a certified professional and training management program that assists you in developing core competencies that will empower you to manage the future training needs of your organization. You can participate in a number of practicums held within the U S or join a virtual practicum from anywhere in the world, but now more training industry.com/cpcm. And I hope you’ll consider joining us next week for our of virtual conference. All about creating cultures of continuous learning in your organization. Registration is free and open now@trainingindustry.com slash Tice. One last reminder that an evaluation survey will pop open in your tab upon exiting the webinar. We’d greatly welcome your feedback. Uh, one more big thank you to our presenters, David and Judy. And of course, thanks to our sponsor Intrepid and to all of you for your time and attention. Thanks for being with us again. Um, I’m Elizabeth Parker with training industry, and I hope you all have a great day.

Share