Is talent leaving your organization, not performing at maximum capability or not engaged in their work? You’re not alone. In our zero-margin-for-error world, the pressure on our companies and our talent to consistently perform is heavier than ever.

Doing our best work means experimenting with new approaches that may fail. By embracing failure and building structures to support it, we can learn from our mistakes and use those lessons to grow and innovate. In order to create and sustain cultures of continuous learning in our organizations, we must build psychologically safe environments that welcome the right kind of failure.

Join this TICE Virtual Conference session. Your presenter, Alycia Angle, industrial and organizational psychologist, will help you understand what psychological safety – or lack thereof – looks like in an organization. We will identify three types of failure and how they may impact your workplace. Finally, we will learn four implementable strategies for building a psychologically safe environment and embracing failure in order to foster a continuous learning culture.

This interactive session will provide easy-to-understand insights on:

  • Understanding what psychological safety is, who is responsible for it and implementable approaches to develop it in your workplace.
  • Identifying three different types of failure and how the negative outcomes of each may impact your organization.
  • Discovering four strategies to create and sustain a culture of continuous learning in your organization by embracing failure.


Speaker

Alycia Angle Alycia Angle, Industrial and Organizational Psychologist
Alycia Angle is an expert in perspective shifting. She is widely recognized for her experience coaching teams and leaders at every level of the organization to partner in positive change. In her work as a consultant and trainer, she leads organizations through transformational growth with hands-on development that satisfies a well-defined need. Alycia is called upon to speak across the country on the science of shifting perspectives – whether in senior executives or new hires. From climbing an active volcano on a tiny island in Indonesia to rubbing elbows with celebrity thought leaders, Alycia’s unique experiences and insight guide others to powerful perspectives that encourage human development. Alycia currently lives in Dallas and serves as a talent development partner to a Fortune 500 tech company.